Southern Horrors

By Ida B. Wells-Barnett
A handy way to read and listen classic literature.

It show all contents of Adventures of Southern Horrors by Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and also integrates modern media and interactive features. You can listen the book as well as read the book at same page. In addition it provides powerful and flexible content search on all chapters, by word, phrase, and sentence; helps very much to understand and analyze details of this masterpiece.
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  1. This page offers flexible search on the whole book of Southern Horrors by Ida B. Wells-Barnett.
  2. It shows contents by chapters; select chapter by yourself.
  3. You can search either the whole book or current chapter.
  4. The search object can be any word, phrase, or even sentence.
  5. The search result is highlighted by green. You will see an abstract of the search; the current chapter will jump to show the first result if search result isn't empty.
  6. When run a new search, the original green highlight contents will be reset.
  7. Blank is also a search factor, for example, "the" and " the " are different search object.
  8. If search object is empty, no search result will be returned, but previous search results will be reset.
  9. You may change text and background colors; notice not to confuse with searched contents that have be highlighted in green.
  10. Listen and read synchronously is an effective way to study English, this page is designed to help you trace what you heard and keep your ears and eyes in same page. Enjoy it!
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HON. FRED. DOUGLASS'S LETTER

Dear Miss Wells:

Let me give you thanks for your faithful paper on the lynch abomination now generally practiced against colored people in the South. There has been no word equal to it in convincing power. I have spoken, but my word is feeble in comparison. You give us what you know and testify from actual knowledge. You have dealt with the facts with cool, painstaking fidelity and left those naked and uncontradicted facts to speak for themselves.

Brave woman! you have done your people and mine a service which can neither be weighed nor measured. If American conscience were only half alive, if the American church and clergy were only half christianized, if American moral sensibility were not hardened by persistent infliction of outrage and crime against colored people, a scream of horror, shame and indignation would rise to Heaven wherever your pamphlet shall be read.

But alas! even crime has power to reproduce itself and create conditions favorable to its own existence. It sometimes seems we are deserted by earth and Heaven yet we must still think, speak and work, and trust in the power of a merciful God for final deliverance.

Very truly and gratefully yours,

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

Cedar Hill, Anacostia, D.C., Oct. 25, 1892