11th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 11: With Definition - 4
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 Grade 11: With Definition - 4
etiquettespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. manners; rules governing socially acceptable behavior
In everything else the etiquette of the day might stand the strictest investigation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
She wondered, indeed, at his thinking it necessary to do so; but supposed it to be the proper etiquette.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39
But he knew that by the etiquette of the race course it was not merely impossible for him to see the horse, but improper even to ask questions about him.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 21
exasperationspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. an exasperated feeling of annoyance; actions that cause great irritation
He began to fume with rage and exasperation.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 17
He now gave a cry of exasperation and made a furious motion with his hand.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 10
He developed the acute exasperation of a pestered animal, a well-meaning cow worried by dogs.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 5
exceedinglyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
ad. in a very great degree; beyond what is usual; surpassingly
Marianne said no more, but looked exceedingly hurt.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
And Mrs. Jennings too, an exceedingly well-behaved woman, though not so elegant as her daughter.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
When an uninstructed multitude attempts to see with its eyes, it is exceedingly apt to be deceived.
The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne
Get Context   In IX. THE LEECH
exceptionalspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. extraordinary; unusual; well above average
Ethan knew the word for one of exceptional import.
Ethan Frome By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In VII
Only to the eyes of a Kennicott was it exceptional.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
The prince rejoiced in health exceptional even among princes.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 4: Chapter 1
excitablespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. capable of responding to stimuli; easily excited
Mr. Soames was a tall, spare man, of a nervous and excitable temperament.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In IX. THE ADVENTURE OF THE THREE STUDENTS
He folded his arms and glared at me with his excitable, slanting brown eyes.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 3. Lena Lingard: IV
Wildeve was a nervous and excitable man, and the game was beginning to tell upon his temper.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: 8 A New Force Disturbs the Current
excruciatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. torment emotionally or mentally; subject to torture
The pain of moving his eyes was too excruciating to be borne and he groaned.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
These she began to thrust into the image in all directions, with apparently excruciating energy.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 5: 7 The Night of the Sixth of November
Then he understood that it must be in pain: pain so excruciating that he seemed, mysteriously, to feel it shooting through his own body.
Ethan Frome By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In IX
exhibitionspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. exposition; presentation; large-scale public showing
I saw one at the Vienna exhibition, which binds with a wire, said Sviazhsky.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 6: Chapter 22
Almost any exhibition of complete self sufficiency draws a stunned tribute from me.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 1
It is some systematized exhibition of the whale in his broad genera, that I would now fain put before you.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
expatiatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. add details, as to an account or idea; clarify the meaning of and discourse in a learned way, usually in writing
From his mighty bulk the whale affords a most congenial theme whereon to enlarge, amplify, and generally expatiate.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 104. The Fossil Whale.
Now, as the business of standing mast-heads, ashore or afloat, is a very ancient and interesting one, let us in some measure expatiate here.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
Albert was constantly expatiating on their good fortune in meeting such a man.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 36. The Carnival at Rome.
expensespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. amounts paid for goods and services
It was an immense and solid building, erected at a vast expense.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
To save expense, perhaps you can make up something here for myself.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. MY AUNT ASTONISHES ME
As he had no idea of deceiving her, and always desired to please her, he was thus made chary of launching into expense.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP
expungedspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. remove by erasing or crossing out or as if by drawing a line
expungingspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. deletion by an act of expunging or erasing
extensionspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. supplement; act of extending or the condition of being extended
This extension of power can almost be believed in at such moments.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: 3 How a Little Sound Produced a Great Dream
I felt a considerable extension of power and authority, and was anxious to acquit myself creditably.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 1. The Shimerdas: XIV
My journeys became more and more extensive and more productive.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 44. The Vendetta.
extraordinaryspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. exceptional; remarkable; beyond what is ordinary or usual
Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
Nothing but real indisposition could occasion this extraordinary delay.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
When I had lain awake a little while, those extraordinary voices with which silence teems began to make themselves audible.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
extrapolatespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. estimate the value of; draw from specific cases for more general cases
fallacyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. deceptive or false appearance; false notion; deception
He exposed their risk and fallacy with his usual skill; and it was only after he had removed every impediment, in the shape of opposing advice, that he ventured to propose his own projects.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
Whenever she was restless she dodged her thoughts by the familiar vagabond fallacy of running away from them, of moving on to a new place, and thus she persuaded herself that she was tranquil.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By A. Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 1. Mr. Sherlock Holmes
favorablyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
ad. showing approval; with approval
The third, the artilleryman, on the contrary, struck Katavasov very favorably.
Anna Karenina(V3) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 8: Chapter 3
A low murmur of applause announced that the compliment of the tribe was favorably received.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
That impression had been favorable.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 1: Chapter 12
fieryspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. characterized by intense emotion; like or suggestive of fire; very intense
I was experiencing an ordeal: a hand of fiery iron grasped my vitals.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
His face was as fiery as ever; his eyes were as small, and rather deeper set.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
Exhaustion of body had entirely subdued her spirit: our fiery Catherine was no better than a wailing child.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
fluespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. flat bladelike projection on the arm of an anchor; organ pipe whose tone is produced by air passing across the sharp edge of a fissure or lip
But that darkness was licked up by the fierce flames, which at intervals forked forth from the sooty flues, and illuminated every lofty rope in the rigging, as with the famed Greek fire.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 96. The Try-Works.
foreignerspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. someone who is excluded from or is not a member of a group; a person who comes from a foreign country
He was still a foreigner, and he expected to remain one.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
They are certainly less particular with a foreigner than with a Frenchman.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 76. Progress of Cavalcanti the Younger.
She had an idea that he would have to be a foreigner: not an Englishman, still less an Irishman.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence
Get Context   In Chapter 6
forfeitspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. lose or be deprived of property or a right or privilege as a penalty for wrongdoing
If you leave, you forfeit your whole position forever.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In II. THE RED-HEADED LEAGUE
It was right that I should pay the forfeit of my headlong passion.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 59. RETURN
A truant provincial was paying the forfeit of his disobedience, by being plundered of those very effects which had caused him to desert his place in the ranks.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
foursomespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. four people considered as a unit; the cardinal number that is the sum of three and one
fragilespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. easy to destroy, delicate, not strong
Besides, he was now more firmly than ever under the protection of the fragile Melanie.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
There is a kind of beauty so intense, yet so fragile, that we cannot bear to look at it.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
How fragile and tender women are, he thought, the mere mention of war and harshness makes them faint.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
fraughtspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. furnished or equipped; sufficient to satisfy
Meanwhile, councils went on in the kitchen at home, fraught with almost insupportable aggravation to my exasperated spirit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
If I were engaged in any high undertaking or design, fraught with extensive utility to my fellow creatures, then could I live to fulfil it.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
At last, arrayed for the purpose at a vast expense, I went to Miss Mills's, fraught with a declaration.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
futilespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. useless; having no useful result; vain
No, I suddenly found myself on the curtain, an actor, posturing and making futile gestures.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
For the dozenth time, she ran out onto the porch but this time she did not go back to her futile packing.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
Here was the end of the kindly, courteous house which had always welcomed her, the house where in futile dreams she had aspired to be mistress.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
galaspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a social occasion with special entertainments or performances
gentlemanspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a manservant who acts as a personal attendant to his employer; a man of refinement
Not to hide the truth, Mistress Hester, my thoughts happen just now to be busy with the gentleman.
The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne
Get Context   In XIV. HESTER AND THE PHYSICIAN
The letter was from this gentleman himself, and written in the true spirit of friendly accommodation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
The old gentleman died: his will was read, and like almost every other will, gave as much disappointment as pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
girthspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. distance around something; circumference; size; bulk
In shape, he differs in some degree from the Huzza Porpoise, being of a less rotund and jolly girth; indeed, he is of quite a neat and gentleman-like figure.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
It took but a few moments to release the gases pent up in the poor beast, and the two women heard the rush of wind and saw the roan visibly diminish in girth.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 1. The Shimerdas: XVIII
In the length he attains, and in his baleen, the Fin-back resembles the right whale, but is of a less portly girth, and a lighter colour, approaching to olive.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
gleanspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. gather; collect gradually and bit by bit; pick up
He could glean nothing from their faces; they might as well have been of stone.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER LII
A visit to the boy suggested itself as a means of gleaning new particulars; though it might be quite unproductive.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 5: 2 A Lurid Light Breaks in upon a Darkened Understanding
gorespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. dirt; mud; blood; especially, blood that after effusion has become thick or clotted; wedge-shaped or triangular piece of cloth
There were traces of his gore in that spot, and I covered them with garden-mould from the eye of man.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
I must dip my hand again and again in the basin of blood and water, and wipe away the trickling gore.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
The unicorn soon came towards him, and rushed directly on the tailor, as if it would gore him with its horn without more ado.
Grimms' Fairy Tales By The Brothers Grimm
Get Context   In THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR
grotesquelyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
ad. in a comically or distorted manner
It was not well drawn; it was too finicking; the pillars in the background were grotesquely squat.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
He was a tall and stately person, scrupulously dressed, with a drawn, thin face, and a nose which was grotesquely curved and long.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In V. THE ADVENTURE OF THE PRIORY SCHOOL
But what shocked me more than any signs of physical weakness was that his face was grotesquely criss-crossed with sticking-plaster, and that one large pad of it was fastened over his mouth.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In X. The Adventure of The Greek Interpreter
gullyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. deep ditch cut by running water, especially after a prolonged downpour
This slope was trampled hard and bare, and washed out in winding gullies by the rain.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 1. The Shimerdas: II
As I went along the road back to the bridge, I kept picking off little pieces of scaly chalk from the dried water gullies, and breaking them up in my hands.
My Antonia By Willa Cather
Get Context   In BOOK 2. The Hired Girls: XIV
Deep ruts and furrows were cut into the road where horses had dragged heavy guns along it and the red gullies on either side were deeply gashed by the wheels.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
gymnasiumspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. place or building where athletic exercises are performed; a school for gymnastics
The change which she did heed was the erection of the schoolbuilding, with its cheerful brick walls, broad windows, gymnasium, classrooms for agriculture and cooking.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
And here, except when I have the kids in gymnasium class, or when I'm chaperoning the basket-ball team on a trip out-of-town, I won't dare to move above a whisper.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
handkerchiefspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. a square piece of cloth used for wiping the eyes or nose or as a costume accessory
Here she took out her handkerchief; but Elinor did not feel very compassionate.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
He had rolled a handkerchief round his head, and his face was set and lowering in his sleep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
She convinced herself of it and cried into her handkerchief as if the very suggestion was more than she could endure.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 9
harebrainedspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. very foolish; rash; ill judged
havocspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. wide and general destruction; devastation; waste
The musketry sounded in long irregular surges that played havoc with his ears.
The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane
Get Context   In Chapter 8
The havoc that months had previously wrought was now emulated by the inroads of hours.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
Before the wedding the tailor was to catch him a wild boar that made great havoc in the forest, and the huntsmen should give him their help.
Grimms' Fairy Tales By The Brothers Grimm
Get Context   In THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR
heroicspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. showing extreme courage; especially of actions courageously undertaken in desperation; of behavior that is impressive and ambitious in scale or scope
He composed heroic songs and began to write many a tale of enchantment and knightly adventure.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
But I was restrained, when I thought of the heroic and suffering Elizabeth, whom I tenderly loved, and whose existence was bound up in mine.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 9
He was obviously convinced, especially now after drinking, that he was performing a heroic action, and he bragged of it in the most unpleasant way.
Anna Karenina(V3) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 8: Chapter 3
hindrancespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. something that holds back or causes problems with something else; obstacle
The cuttlefish is no hindrance.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 5: Chapter 2
Princess Varvara is no help, but a hindrance.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 6: Chapter 31
You would be a hindrance to me, said Levin, trying to be cool.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 5: Chapter 16
horticulturespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. cultivation of plants; the art or practice of garden cultivation and management
Every man has a devouring passion in his heart, as every fruit has its worm; that of the telegraph man was horticulture.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 61. How a Gardener May Get Rid of the Dormice tha...
Our agriculture and horticulture destroy a weed just here and there and cultivate perhaps a score or so of wholesome plants, leaving the greater number to fight out a balance as they can.
The Time Machine By H. G. Wells
Get Context   In IV
hoverspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. hang about; wait nearby; remain floating
Over Descartian vortices you hover.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
I will hover near and direct the steel aright.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
It was of white marble, in shape something like a winged sphinx, but the wings, instead of being carried vertically at the sides, were spread so that it seemed to hover.
The Time Machine By H. G. Wells
Get Context   In III
humbugspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. pretentious or silly talk or writing; something intended to deceive; deliberate trickery intended to gain an advantage
Charley profanely hinted they were humbug.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
For my part, I think half this republican talk sheer humbug.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
This relieved me; and once more, and finally as it seemed to me, I pronounced him in my heart, a humbug.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. The Prophet.
humoristspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. someone who acts speaks or writes in an amusing way
Then again, Stubb was one of those odd sort of humorists, whose jollity is sometimes so curiously ambiguous, as to put all inferiors on their guard in the matter of obeying them.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
hybridspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. something of mixed origin or composition
There never before was seen on earth such a wonderful hybrid race as was thus produced.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
hygienespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. conditions or practices conducive to maintaining health and preventing disease; sanitation
There were crack skaters there, showing off their skill, and learners clinging to chairs with timid, awkward movements, boys, and elderly people skating with hygienic motives.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 1: Chapter 9
hypocrisyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. practice of professing beliefs, feelings, or virtues that one does not hold; falseness; expression of agreement that is not supported by real conviction
And if that was hypocrisy, let Atlanta make the most of it.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
That feeling was an intimate, familiar feeling, like a consciousness of hypocrisy, which she experienced in her relations with her husband.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 1: Chapter 30
I still stood absolutely dumfoundered at what appeared to me her miraculous self-possession and most inscrutable hypocrisy, when the cook entered.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
immensespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. enormous; boundless; so great as to be beyond measurement
They say he was the only support of an immense family.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 1: Chapter 18
The great vault brightened, like the dome of an immense lamp.
The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne
Get Context   In XII. THE MINISTER'S VIGIL
His constant height is of a piece with his immense abilities.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
impersonalspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. having no personal preference; objective
His one eye met hers with an impersonal animosity.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLII
For a brief moment she wondered with impersonal curiosity what would be expected of a mistress.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
He had been kindness itself during her miserable convalescence, but it was the kindness of an impersonal stranger.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER LVII
implacablespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. incapable of being pacified; not to be relieved;
They expressed the most implacable hatred.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 6: Chapter 28
The president called for the indictment, revised as we know, by the clever and implacable pen of Villefort.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 110. The Indictment.
He renewed against Danglars, Fernand, and Villefort the oath of implacable vengeance he had made in his dungeon.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 21. The Island of Tiboulen.
importunespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
v. beg persistently; ask for urgently or repeatedly; annoy
Gradually, to be sure, the stress of the old thoughts would return; but at least they did not importune her waking hour.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 10
Among these importunate signs was one that had caught the attention of the family by its pictures.
The Jungle By Upton Sinclair
Get Context   In Chapter 5
And to the importunity of their persisted questionings he had finally given in; and so it came to pass that every one now knew the shameful story of his wretched fate.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 112. The Blacksmith.
impudentspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. improperly forward or bold; marked by casual disrespect
Basil was a little boy with impudent blue eyes and a turned-up nose, and Mary hated him.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
When you take the liberty of calling me mean or base, or anything of that sort, you are an impudent beggar.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
A bell rang, some young men, ugly and impudent, and at the same time careful of the impression they were making, hurried by.
Anna Karenina(V3) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In PART 7: Chapter 31
inabilityspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. lack of ability, especially mental ability, to do something
The more I consider this mighty tail, the more do I deplore my inability to express it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 86. The Tail.
The inability thus to solace her outraged feelings gave her a paralyzing sense of insignificance.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 15
Lily had taken up her work early in January: it was now two months later, and she was still being rebuked for her inability to sew spangles on a hat-frame.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 10
inaugurationspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. the ceremonial induction into a position; the act of starting a new operation or practice
Miss Josephine Sleary, as some very long and very narrow strips of printed bill announced, was then inaugurating the entertainments with her graceful equestrian Tyrolean flower-act.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
I'd rather Bonnie was invited to eat dry bread in the Picards' miserable house or Mrs. Elsing's rickety barn than to be the belle of a Republican inaugural ball.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER LII
incalculablespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. not capable of being computed or enumerated
It might do incalculable mischief to his business prospects.
The Awakening By Kate Chopin
Get Context   In XXXII
The motions of her mind were as incalculable as the flit of a bird in the branches.
Ethan Frome By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In II
A moment ago the night had been coldly empty; now it was incalculable, hot, treacherous.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
incidentallyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
ad. by chance; as a chance occurrence; accidentally
When I refer to them, incidentally, it is only as a part of my progress.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. DOMESTIC
It incidentally showed that her apparent languor did not arise from lack of force.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: 3 The First Act in a Timeworn Drama
This peculiarity is strikingly evinced in the head, as in some part of this book will be incidentally shown.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 55. Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales.
inclementspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. stormy; showing no mercy; physically severe
We can understand his taking an evening stroll, but the ground was damp and the night inclement.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By A. Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 3. The Problem
He has been eight years upon a project for extracting sunbeams out of cucumbers, which were to be put in phials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the air in raw inclement summers.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER V.
incredulouslyspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
ad. in a manner indicating disbelief
Magua shook his head incredulously.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
Her host looked at her incredulously.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 1
I laughed incredulously as Sherlock Holmes leaned back in his settee and blew little wavering rings of smoke up to the ceiling.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By A. Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 1. Mr. Sherlock Holmes
indispensablespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. essential; requisite; impossible to be omitted or remitted
She at first lacked the depravity indispensable to shutting me up in mental darkness.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVI
There was no indispensable necessity for my communicating with Joe by letter, inasmuch as he sat beside me and we were alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
indoctrinationspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. teaching someone to accept doctrines uncritically
inducteespeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. someone who is drafted into military service; a person inducted into an organization or social group
ineffectualspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. insufficient to produce a desired effect; fruitless
It was a strong effort of the spirit of good, but it was ineffectual.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
Miss Gertrude Farish, in fact, typified the mediocre and the ineffectual.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 8
I was like the Arabian who had been buried with the dead and found a passage to life, aided only by one glimmering and seemingly ineffectual light.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
infidelspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
n. one who does not hold same religious beliefs as another
Only the infidel sharks in the audacious seas may give ear to such words, when, with tornado brow, and eyes of red murder, and foam-glued lips, Ahab leaped after his prey.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
Yet, brother, take my advice, and file your tongue to a little more courtesy than your habits of predominating over infidel captives and Eastern bondsmen have accustomed you.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
Doubts of all things earthly, and intuitions of some things heavenly; this combination makes neither believer nor infidel, but makes a man who regards them both with equal eye.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 85. The Fountain.
inflammatoryspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. characterized or caused by inflammation; arousing to action or rebellion
I cannot conceive why everybody of his standing who visited at our house should always have put me through the same inflammatory process under similar circumstances.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
influentialspeak speak spelling word quiz spelling 
a. important; powerful; having or exercising influence or power
Or at least if this were otherwise, there were not wanting other motives much more influential with him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46. Surmises.
You have found in him an influential and kind friend, who will be kinder yet, I venture to predict, if you deserve it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. I AM A NEW BOY IN MORE SENSES THAN ONE
Then he became alarmed, and dared not stay any longer at Nimes, so he solicited a change of residence, and, as he was in reality very influential, he was nominated to Versailles.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 44. The Vendetta.