11th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 11: With Definition - 7
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 Grade 11: With Definition - 7
rehabilitatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. restore to proper condition; help to re-adapt, as to former state of health or good repute
relicspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. surviving remnant; something left after loss or decay; object kept for its association with the past
Miss Havisham had settled down, I hardly knew how, upon the floor, among the faded bridal relics with which it was strewn.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
Barnicot is an enthusiastic admirer of Napoleon, and his house is full of books, pictures, and relics of the French Emperor.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Quickly she snatched the curtain lengths from Scarlett, holding them against her monumental, sagging breasts as if they were holy relics.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 32
By Margaret Mitche Context
religiousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. of religion; concerned with religion; having or showing belief in and reverence for God or a deity
The ownership of property has now become a religious question: as it has been since Jesus and St Francis.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 13
By D H Lawrence Context
No matter what the subject might be, a brainracking effort was made to squirm it into some aspect or other that the moral and religious mind could contemplate with edification.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 21
By Mark Twain Context
remembrancespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the ability to recall past occurrences; a recognition of meritorious service
Her two absent cousins, especially Maria, were much in her thoughts on seeing him; but no embarrassing remembrance affected his spirits.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
She had had a disappointment, moreover, which that book, and especially the history of her own family, must ever present the remembrance of.
Persuasion - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
I can make no claim therefore to have known, at that time, how matters stood; or to have any remembrance, founded on the evidence of my own senses, of what follows.
David Copperfield - Chapter 1
By Charles Dickens Context
remuneratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make payment to; compensate
Trabb measured and calculated me in the parlor, as if I were an estate and he the finest species of surveyor, and gave himself such a world of trouble that I felt that no suit of clothes could possibly remunerate him for his pains.
Great Expectations - Chapter 19
By Charles Dickens Context
rendspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. split; tear or split apart or into pieces violently
With a rending, tearing sound, one of the broad, white stones turned over upon its side and left a square, gaping hole, through which streamed the light of a lantern.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
renownspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. fame; quality of being widely honored and acclaimed
It is a name of heroism and renown; of kings, princes, and knights; and seems to breathe the spirit of chivalry and warm affections.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
I answered, laughing, that I thought we might get through it in that time, but that he must come also; for he would find that his renown had preceded him, and that he was almost as great a personage as I was.
David Copperfield - Chapter 21
By Charles Dickens Context
reparationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act of putting something in working order again; act or process of making amends; compensation
If you but make such reparation as is in your power, by telling us where the beryls are, all shall be forgiven and forgotten.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The very friend to whom you communicated your misgivings as to the Prophet and his mission, might be one of those who would come forth at night with fire and sword to exact a terrible reparation.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
repentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cause to feel remorse or regret; feel regret or self-reproach for
Rushworth had, perhaps, been accepted on too short an acquaintance, and, on knowing him better, she was repenting.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
He stood about, restless and uneasy, for a while, glancing at the door, every now and then, hoping she would repent and come to find him.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 7
By Mark Twain Context
But the poor dame had reason to repent of her kindness: she and her husband both took the fever, and died within a few days of each other.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
representativespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one that represents anything; that which exhibits a likeness or similitude; agent
When he was sober he used to be fond of playing backgammon and draughts with me, and he would make me his representative both with the servants and with the tradespeople, so that by the time that I was sixteen I was quite master of the house.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
repugnantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. arousing disgust or aversion; offensive or repulsive; hateful
They were no sooner gone, than Monks, who appeared to entertain an invincible repugnance to being left alone, called to a boy who had been hidden somewhere below.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
requisitespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. necessary requirement; indispensable item
Difficulties had arisen in the construction of this machine, simple as it was; requisites had been found wanting, and messages had had to go and return.
Hard Times - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
And the valet, who had begun to attempt a brogue out of admiration for his new master, made requisite answer in a combination of Geechee and County Meath that would have puzzled anyone except those two alone.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
The expense would be nothing, the inconvenience not more; and it was altogether an attention which the delicacy of his conscience pointed out to be requisite to its complete enfranchisement from his promise to his father.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 36
By Jane Austen Context
resistancespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. action of opposing something that you disapprove or disagree with
Only when I pressed the cold muzzle of the revolver to his temple did he at last understand that resistance was vain.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
His face and hands were terribly mangled by his passage through the glass, but loss of blood had no effect in diminishing his resistance.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Left alone with her mother, Louisa saw her lying with an awful lull upon her face, like one who was floating away upon some great water, all resistance over, content to be carried down the stream.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
resolutelyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. showing firm determination or purpose; with firmness
He never gave reasons for this persistent refusal, but contented himself by resolutely and inflexibly adhering to his determination.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Resolutely she took it by the hem and jerked, put it in her mouth and gnawed, until finally the material gave with a rip and tore the length.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 24
By Margaret Mitche Context
resolutionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. determination; resolving to do something; formal statement of a decision
The basin was refilled, and this time he stood over it a little while, gathering resolution; took in a big breath and began.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
I had a catching of the breath, and my skin went cold at the words, which were slowly uttered in a tone of concentrated resolution.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Elizabeth would wonder, and probably would blame her; and though her resolution was not to be shaken, her feelings must be hurt by such a disapprobation.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
resplendentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. dazzling; glorious; shining with brilliant luster; very bright
They were such resplendent uniforms, brave with shining buttons and dazzling with twined gold braid on cuffs and collars, the red and yellow and blue stripes on the trousers, for the different branches of the service, setting off the gray to perfection.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
responsibilityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. duties; obligation; state of being responsible, accountable, or answerable
I felt no inclination to tarry the event; and, resolving to seek medical aid on my own responsibility, I quitted the chamber.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 12
By Emily Bronte Context
I have no doubt she has connived at your desertion of your duties and responsibilities, so do not expect me to show pleasure in seeing her.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 19
By D H Lawrence Context
The Duke is greatly agitated, and, as to me, you have seen yourselves the state of nervous prostration to which the suspense and the responsibility have reduced me.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
restrictivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. tending or serving to restrict; limiting; confining
Though their caution may prove eventually unnecessary, it was kindly meant; and of this you may be assured, that every advantage of affluence will be doubled by the little privations and restrictions that may have been imposed.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 32
By Jane Austen Context
resurgencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. bringing again into activity and prominence
retortspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. reply, especially to answer in a quick, caustic, or witty manner
I had leisure to entertain the retort in my mind, while he slowly lifted his heavy glance from the pavement, up my legs and arms, to my face.
Great Expectations - Chapter 29
By Charles Dickens Context
She missed him, missed his light flippant touch in anecdotes that made her shout with laughter, his sardonic grin that reduced troubles to their proper proportions, missed even his jeers that stung her to angry retort.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 56
By Margaret Mitche Context
revelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. to take great pleasure or delight; make merry
Even in this flash of revelation, she realized vaguely that, foolish though they seemed, theirs was the right attitude.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 35
By Margaret Mitche Context
revenuespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. money which returns from an investment; annual income; reward
reverberatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. to throw or bend back, from a surface; ring or echo with sound; spring back; spring away from an impact
There still reverberated in her mind the crashes of the two impregnable citadels of her life, thundering to dust about her ears.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 62
By Margaret Mitche Context
At the end of the passage, while the bell was still reverberating, I found Sarah Pocket, who appeared to have now become constitutionally green and yellow by reason of me.
Great Expectations - Chapter 29
By Charles Dickens Context
It was before this ruinous building that the worthy couple paused, as the first peal of distant thunder reverberated in the air, and the rain commenced pouring violently down.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
revilespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. attack with abusive language; vilify
ridiculousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. completely lacking of wisdom or good sense
The human beings could not contain their rage when they heard this song, though they pretended to think it merely ridiculous.
Animal Farm - Chapter 4
By George Orwell Context
She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 3
By Jane Austen Context
In fact everything was a little ridiculous, or very ridiculous: certainly everything connected with authority, whether it were in the army or the government or the universities, was ridiculous to a degree.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
rigmarolespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a long and complicated and confusing procedure
rubblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. broken fragments; irregular pieces of rock
But, determined to build himself a monument of a reputation quickly, he used any handy rubble in the making.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 3
By D H Lawrence Context
sagespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one celebrated for wisdom, experience, and judgment; various plants of the genus Salvia
Gradgrind and a council of political sages approved of Jem, and it was resolved to send him down to Coketown, to become known there and in the neighbourhood.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
satisfactorilyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. in a way that fulfills expectations or needs; acceptably
I used to draw a comparison between him and Hindley Earnshaw, and perplex myself to explain satisfactorily why their conduct was so opposite in similar circumstances.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
I intimated that my aunt would be proud and delighted to make their acquaintance; though I must say I was not quite sure of their getting on very satisfactorily together.
David Copperfield - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
And with every day that passed, she became more sure in her own mind of his devotion, more certain he would arrange matters satisfactorily when the Yankees were finally beaten.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
scarcespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. hard to find; absent or rare; limited
scoundrelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
My business was to declare myself a scoundrel, and whether I did it with a bow or a bluster was of little importance.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 44
By Jane Austen Context
She thought that some of them had been laying violent hands on me; and, not daring to attack her master, she turned her vocal artillery against the younger scoundrel.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
At the foot of the stairs, however, she met this Lascar scoundrel of whom I have spoken, who thrust her back and, aided by a Dane, who acts as assistant there, pushed her out into the street.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
scrawnyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. being very thin; inferior in size or quality
securityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. freedom from risk or danger; safety
One of our most lucrative means of laying out money is in the shape of loans, where the security is unimpeachable.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Betsey funded her property for some time, and then, by the advice of her man of business, laid it out on landed security.
David Copperfield - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
segregationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a social system that provides separate facilities for minority groups
sensibilityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. ability to feel or perceive; keen intellectual perception
For the first time, since their renewed acquaintance, she felt that she was betraying the least sensibility of the two.
Persuasion - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
They read, they talked, they sang together; his musical talents were considerable; and he read with all the sensibility and spirit which Edward had unfortunately wanted.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
serenespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. calm, peaceful, and untroubled; completely clear and fine
She suddenly felt that this was where she belonged, not in serene and quiet old cities, flat beside yellow waters.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
Therefore, outwardly, it came as the most terrible blow and shock to him, He had kept the surface of his confidence in her quite serene.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 19
By D H Lawrence Context
The beautiful, calm manner, which makes her so different in my remembrance from everybody else, came back again, as if a cloud had passed from a serene sky.
David Copperfield - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
serviettespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing
similespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. comparison of one thing with another, in English generally using like or as
His celebrated passages are quoted by everybody; they are in half the books we open, and we all talk Shakespeare, use his similes, and describe with his descriptions; but this is totally distinct from giving his sense as you gave it.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 34
By Jane Austen Context
situatedspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having a site, situation, or location; being in a relative position; permanently fixed; placed; located
It made her melancholy again; and the knowledge of what must be enduring there, invested even the house, modern, airy, and well situated as it was, with a melancholy aspect.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 46
By Jane Austen Context
It is, as he said, beautifully situated, but it is not beautiful in itself, for it is a large square block of a house, whitewashed, but all stained and streaked with damp and bad weather.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
skittishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. unpredictably excitable, especially of horses
sleekspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having an even, smooth surface; smooth; not rough or harsh
sleuthspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. watch, observe, or inquire secretly
specimenspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. model; sample; an example regarded as typical of its class
There was a sound upon the stairs, and our door was opened to admit as fine a specimen of manhood as ever passed through it.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It was so dark that I could not see the means of exit; and, as I wandered round, I heard another specimen of their civil behaviour amongst each other.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
So the bud blossomed into a flower, and the year which saw her father the richest of the farmers left her as fair a specimen of American girlhood as could be found in the whole Pacific slope.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
spendthriftspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one who spends money recklessly or wastefully
spiritualspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not tangible or material; belonging to religion; sacred; supernatural
Believe me, whatever God there is is slowly eliminating the guts and alimentary system from the human being, to evolve a higher, more spiritual being.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 16
By D H Lawrence Context
The dismal spiritual atmosphere overcame, and more than neutralised, the glowing physical comforts round me; and I resolved to be cautious how I ventured under those rafters a third time.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
sporadicspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. occurring at irregular intervals; having no pattern or order in time
Eventually, in the year 1869, the movement rather suddenly collapsed, although there have been sporadic outbreaks of the same sort since that date.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
squalorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. filthy and wretched condition or quality; dirty or neglected state
squeamishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. excessively fastidious and easily disgusted
stagnantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not moving or flowing; lacking vitality or briskness; stale; dull
It was as if a sweet clear spring had begun to rise in a stagnant pool and had risen and risen until at last it swept the dark water away.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 27
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
It was a stagnant, warm, and misty night, full of all the heavy perfumes of new vegetation not yet dried by hot sun, and among these particularly the scent of the fern.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
It was difficult to realise as we looked at the line of fine shops and stately business premises that they really abutted on the other side upon the faded and stagnant square which we had just quitted.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
stagnatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be idle; exist in a changeless situation; stand still; cease to flow; stand without moving
One point was evident in this; that she had been existing in a suppressed state, and not in one of languor, or stagnation.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
stagyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having characteristics of the stage especially an artificial and mannered quality
stalwartspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. marked by imposing physical strength; firmly built; firm and resolute
We had all risen to our feet, our prisoner breathing hard, with a stalwart constable on each side of him.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He banged at the door, and presently the heads of the old man and his two stalwart sons were thrust from windows.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 29
By Mark Twain Context
staminaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. physical or moral strength to resist or withstand illness; enduring strength and energy
statelyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. majestic; impressive, as in size or proportions
She supervised the meal officially, but implied that in her own stately person she considered lunch a weakness.
Hard Times - Chapter 9
By Charles Dickens Context
He was a tall and stately person, scrupulously dressed, with a drawn, thin face, and a nose which was grotesquely curved and long.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It was difficult to realise as we looked at the line of fine shops and stately business premises that they really abutted on the other side upon the faded and stagnant square which we had just quitted.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
steadfastspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. firmly or constant loyal; fixed or unchanging
It was an earnest, steadfast gaze, but she often doubted whether there were much admiration in it, and sometimes it seemed nothing but absence of mind.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 32
By Jane Austen Context
stealthyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. marked by quiet and caution and secrecy; taking pains to avoid being observed
Then he bent over and kissed the faded lips, and straightway made his stealthy exit, latching the door behind him.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 15
By Mark Twain Context
Nevertheless the stealthy beating of the round in search of poachers soothed his nerves and took his mind off his thoughts.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 10
By D H Lawrence Context
Belated wanderers upon the mountains spoke of gangs of armed men, masked, stealthy, and noiseless, who flitted by them in the darkness.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
stintspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. length of time spent in particular way; allotted amount; limitation or restriction; fixed amount of work allotted
stipulatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. specify or arrange in agreement; express demand in agreement; promise in agreement
But, he was particular in stipulating that if I were not received with cordiality, or if I were not encouraged to repeat my visit as a visit which had no ulterior object but was simply one of gratitude for a favor received, then this experimental trip should have no successor.
Great Expectations - Chapter 15
By Charles Dickens Context
strenuousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. arduous; intense; performed with much energy or force;
I felt, as I looked upon that supple figure, alive with nervous energy, that it was indeed a strenuous day that awaited us.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I only know that I found myself, with a perseverance worthy of a much better cause, making the most strenuous exertions to compress it within those limits.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
stretchspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. extend; pull in opposite directions; lie down comfortably
Putting his hands into his pockets, he stretched out his legs in front of the fire and laughed heartily for some minutes.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I think Tom may be gradually falling into trouble, and I wish to stretch out a helping hand to him from the depths of my wicked experience.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
At present my attention was centred upon the single grim motionless figure which lay stretched upon the boards, with vacant sightless eyes staring up at the discoloured ceiling.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
stupendousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. astonishing; wonderful; amazing, especially, astonishing in magnitude or elevation
sublimespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. of high spiritual, moral, or intellectual worth; characterized by nobility; majestic
Moreover, the healthy spirits who had mounted to this sublime height were attractive to many of the Gradgrind school.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context