9th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 9: With Definition - 3
Get Vocabulary/Definition by list: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
 Actions upon current list
 All lists of current grdae
 Grade 9: With Definition - 3
desirespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a strong feeling of wanting to have something or wishing for something to happen
There were at least three others whose desire for vengeance upon me would only be increased by the death of their leader.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Huck started sorrowfully away, and Tom stood looking after him, with a strong desire tugging at his heart to yield his pride and go along too.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 16
By Mark Twain Context
They were always very careful, I observed, to turn my face away from the window, so that I became consumed with the desire to see what was going on behind my back.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
despairspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. loss of hope; utter hopelessness; complete despondency
When I saw how many were waiting, I would have given it up in despair; but Spaulding would not hear of it.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
McFarlane turned to us with a gesture of despair, and sank into his chair once more like one who is crushed.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
That was the death of all desire, the death of all love: this despair that was like the dark cave inside the men, in which their spirit was lost.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 14
By D H Lawrence Context
detainspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. keep back or from; withhold; restrain from proceeding; stay or stop; delay
Clair, then it is obvious that no crime has been committed, and that, therefore, I am illegally detained.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I am looking for Henry every day, and as soon as he comes there will be nothing to detain me at Mansfield.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 29
By Jane Austen Context
But, I had already considered that such a course, by detaining us there, or binding us to come back, might be fatal to Provis.
Great Expectations - Chapter 53
By Charles Dickens Context
devoidspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. completely lacking; barren or empty
Evidently he had overheard the whole conversation, for he grinned up at her as maliciously as a tomcat, and again his eyes went over her, in a gaze totally devoid of the deference she was accustomed to.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
dexterityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. right-handedness; readiness and grace in physical activity; skill and ease in using the hands; expertness in manual acts
But, he was on his feet directly, and after sponging himself with a great show of dexterity began squaring again.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
At this signal, the little elephant, with a dexterity that was next to marvellous in so small an animal, whisked the chair round with Mr.
David Copperfield - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
differspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be or stand apart; disagree; be unlike; be distinguished
Carefully Holmes held each separate shard to the light, but in no way did it differ from any other shattered piece of plaster.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
digestspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. break down; make more concise; convert food into absorbable substances
Scarlett digested this in silence, for she had never before been under the same roof with anyone who was not received.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
diminishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. dwindle; reduce; make smaller or less or to cause to appear so
The reddleman watched his form as it diminished to a speck on the road and became absorbed in the thickening films of night.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
Ashley came home four days before Christmas, with a group of the County boys also on furlough, a sadly diminished group since Gettysburg.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 15
By Margaret Mitche Context
His face and hands were terribly mangled by his passage through the glass, but loss of blood had no effect in diminishing his resistance.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
discardspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. throw out something from one's hand; get rid of
Discarded garments lay about her on the floor, the bed, the chairs, in bright heaps of color and straying ribbons.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
dischargespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. relieve of a burden or of contents; unload; pour forth or release; complete or carry out; give off
For some time there was no noise but the grating sound of the spades discharging their freight of mould and gravel.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 9
By Mark Twain Context
Nothing has, as yet, turned up; and it may not surprise you, my dear Master Copperfield, so much as it would a stranger, to know that we are at present waiting for a remittance from London, to discharge our pecuniary obligations at this hotel.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
dismissspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. stop considering; end employment or service of; discharge; refuse to accept or recognize
Dashwood could think of no other question, and Thomas and the tablecloth, now alike needless, were soon afterwards dismissed.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 47
By Jane Austen Context
Gradgrind was not a scientific character, and usually dismissed her children to their studies with this general injunction to choose their pursuit.
Hard Times - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
I would entreat them not to dismiss your request, without a reference to Dora; and to discuss it with her when they should think the time suitable.
David Copperfield - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
displacespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. move or shift from the usual place or position, especially to force to leave a homeland
The shadows were falling thicker now, the last greenish tinge had left the sky and a slight chill was displacing the balminess of spring.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 2
By Margaret Mitche Context
The stones of which the strongest London buildings are made are not more real, or more impossible to be displaced by your hands, than your presence and influence have been to me, there and everywhere, and will be.
Great Expectations - Chapter 44
By Charles Dickens Context
The great Frederick making war on the beautiful Archduchess, Napoleon refusing terms to the beautiful Queen of Prussia, were not more dead to difference of sex than the reddleman was, in his peculiar way, in planning the displacement of Eustacia.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
disproportionatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. unequal; unbalanced; too much or too little in relation to something else
Again her large bonnet (very disproportionate to the figure) went backwards and forwards, in her swaying of her little body to and fro; while a most gigantic bonnet rocked, in unison with it, upon the wall.
David Copperfield - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
disputespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. argument; angry altercation; quarrel; verbal controversy; debate
This arrangement would have worked well enough if it had not been for the disputes between Snowball and Napoleon.
Animal Farm - Chapter 5
By George Orwell Context
Oliver started too, though from a very different cause; for he hoped that the dispute might really end in his being taken back.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
Elizabeth, however, did not choose to take the hint, being well aware that a serious dispute must be the consequence of any reply.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
disruptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. upset; throw into confusion or disorder
The mails were still disrupted, no one knew where the Confederates were or what the Yankees were up to.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 20
By Margaret Mitche Context
dissolvespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. melt; liquefy; cause to pass into solution; cause to disappear or vanish
It would take many years for the living blood of the generations to dissolve the vast black clot of bruised blood, deep inside their souls and bodies.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 5
By D H Lawrence Context
I suffered unspeakable trouble while I considered and reconsidered whether I should at last dissolve that spell of my childhood and tell Joe all the story.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
And while she looked the carmine flush with which warmth and sound sleep had suffused her cheeks and neck dissolved from view, and the deathlike pallor in his face flew across into hers.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
distressspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. discomfort; cause strain, anxiety, or suffering to
In the strength of his misfortune, and the energy of his distress, he fired for the moment like a proud man.
Hard Times - Chapter 9
By Charles Dickens Context
It would be some relief to unseal his tongue for a little while; to divide his burden of distress with another sufferer.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 23
By Mark Twain Context
distributespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. hand out; disseminate; allocate
The soldier with the basket soon got a light, and lighted three or four torches, and took one himself and distributed the others.
Great Expectations - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
It is true that in some cases the figure was bearing a flag, and in some cases not, but it was probable, from the way in which the flags were distributed, that they were used to break the sentence up into words.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
documentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. provide written evidence; record in detail
Here it is; I would not burn it, because being even then very little satisfied with Mr Elliot, I was determined to preserve every document of former intimacy.
Persuasion - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
I felt myself quite a proctor when I read this document aloud with all possible ceremony, and set forth its provisions, any number of times, to those whom they concerned.
David Copperfield - Chapter 31
By Charles Dickens Context
domesticatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cultivate; make fit for cultivation, domestic life, and service to humans
Elizabeth could safely say that it was a great happiness where that was the case, and with equal sincerity could add, that she firmly believed and rejoiced in his domestic comforts.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 38
By Jane Austen Context
dotingspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. weak-minded; foolishly loving and indulgent
No one except the doting father could see anything beautiful about her, but the neighbors were charitable enough to say that all ugly babies turned out pretty, eventually.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 42
By Margaret Mitche Context
drabspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. dull; lacking color; lacking in liveliness, charm, or surprise
But still one little trio was pattering about on tiny feet, alert drab mites, under the straw shelter, refusing to be called in by the anxious mother.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 10
By D H Lawrence Context
drenchspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. wet through and through; soak; put potion down throat of; steep in moisture; wet thoroughly
She stood in the door of the hut, with a blanket round her, looking into the drenched, motionless silence.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 15
By D H Lawrence Context
When they were more than usually tall she lifted the baby to the top of her head, that it might be out of the reach of their drenching fronds.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
Everything in camp was drenched, the campfire as well; for they were but heedless lads, like their generation, and had made no provision against rain.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 16
By Mark Twain Context
droughtspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. dry period; aridity; long period of abnormally low rainfall
I then worked the lawn very carefully for signs and traces, but this drought has made everything as hard as iron.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
drowsyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. dull with sleepiness; showing lack of attention
A whole hour drifted by, the master sat nodding in his throne, the air was drowsy with the hum of study.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 20
By Mark Twain Context
Very soon it made her intensely drowsy, and she went back to her nursery and shut herself in again, frightened by cries she heard in the huts and by the hurrying sound of feet.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 1
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Then she sat swaying her body to and fro, and making gestures with her unnerved arm, which seemed intended as the accompaniment to a fit of laughter, though her face was stolid and drowsy.
Hard Times - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
dualspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. expressing, or consisting of, the number two; belonging to two
In his singular character the dual nature alternately asserted itself, and his extreme exactness and astuteness represented, as I have often thought, the reaction against the poetic and contemplative mood which occasionally predominated in him.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
duplicatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one that corresponds exactly to another, especially an original; identical copy; facsimile
It was claimed that same evening, and returned; but in the interval I had taken a moulding of it, and had a duplicate constructed.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Some little time ago he purchased from Morse Hudson two duplicate plaster casts of the famous head of Napoleon by the French sculptor, Devine.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Moulton, an American gentleman, had left only the day before, and on looking over the entries against him, I came upon the very items which I had seen in the duplicate bill.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
dwellspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. live as a resident; exist in a given place or state
I am glad to dwell upon the earnestness and love with which she lifted up her face to mine, and did so.
David Copperfield - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
That the mother and father, unknown to one another, were dwelling within so many miles, furlongs, yards if you like, of one another.
Great Expectations - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
You slur over work of the utmost finesse and delicacy, in order to dwell upon sensational details which may excite, but cannot possibly instruct, the reader.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
easespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. satisfaction; pleasure; entertainment; freedom from care
Handle them never so lightly, and they fell to pieces with such ease that you might suspect them of having been flawed before.
Hard Times - Chapter 15
By Charles Dickens Context
I never could have believed it without experience, but as Joe and Biddy became more at their cheerful ease again, I became quite gloomy.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
He concealed his fears from his daughter, however, and affected to make light of the whole matter, though she, with the keen eye of love, saw plainly that he was ill at ease.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
economicalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. thrifty; saving; using the minimum of time or resources necessary for effectiveness
edictspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. decree ,especially issued by a sovereign; official command
Force had been piled on top of force and military edicts in increasing numbers had rendered the civil authority more and more impotent.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 47
By Margaret Mitche Context
effectivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. efficient; productive; producing a strong impression or response
Fixing her with my eye in a way which I always found effective with women, I asked her at what hour her son returned.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
efficientspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. effective; acting directly to produce an effect; exhibiting a high ratio of output to input
The efficient, sometimes charming women knew a thing or two about the sensual realities: they had that pull over their jigging English sisters.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 17
By D H Lawrence Context
elaboratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. marked by complexity and richness of detail; done with care and in minute detail
She knew that his elaborate gallantries and his florid speeches were all done with his tongue in his cheek.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
The doctor has certainly played the game for all it is worth, and one would like to know the reason for such elaborate deception.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
elatedspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. overjoyed; extremely happy and excited
For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to everybody.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 5
By Jane Austen Context
Oliver, quite elated and honoured by a sense of his importance, faithfully promised to be secret and explicit in his communications.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 36
By Charles Dickens Context
elevatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. raise; give a promotion to or assign to a higher position
The handkerchief which had hooded her head was now a little thrown back, her face being somewhat elevated.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
Tom was therefore elevated to a place with the Judge and the other elect, and the great news was announced from headquarters.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
She felt that he had every thing to elevate him which general attention and deference, and especially the attention of all the young women, could do.
Persuasion - Chapter 8
By Jane Austen Context
eludespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. avoid cleverly; escape perception of
But if she DID, the letter was written and sent away with a privacy which eluded all her watchfulness to ascertain the fact.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 27
By Jane Austen Context
She sighed as she carefully tied the ribbon about the packet, wondering for the thousandth time just what it was in Ashley that eluded her understanding.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 11
By Margaret Mitche Context
As the man made no answer when I asked him what he did there, but eluded my touch in silence, I ran to the Lodge and urged the watchman to come quickly; telling him of the incident on the way back.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
embarkspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. commence; go on board a boat or airplane; begin a journey
There was no boat off the point, nor any boat drawn up anywhere near it, nor were there any signs of the men having embarked there.
Great Expectations - Chapter 54
By Charles Dickens Context
As a matter of fact, burglars who have done a good stroke of business are, as a rule, only too glad to enjoy the proceeds in peace and quiet without embarking on another perilous undertaking.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
emergespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. come into prominence; spring up; appear
In a very short time a decrepit figure had emerged from the opium den, and I was walking down the street with Sherlock Holmes.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
When he did emerge, it was in a ceremonial manner, with an escort of six dogs who closely surrounded him and growled if anyone came too near.
Animal Farm - Chapter 7
By George Orwell Context
I did detect a figure creeping along the inner fence of the park; but it was not my young mistress: on its emerging into the light, I recognised one of the grooms.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 24
By Emily Bronte Context
employspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. engage the services of; put to work; apply
For a day or two we were busily employed in unpacking and laying out our property to the best advantage.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
My dear Dora, unless we learn to do our duty to those whom we employ, they will never learn to do their duty to us.
David Copperfield - Chapter 48
By Charles Dickens Context
And I even attempted, more than once, for my own private satisfaction, to employ his methods in their solution, though with indifferent success.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
enchantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. charm by sorcery; get control of by magical words and rites
The boys were enchanted, as she had intended them to be, and they hastened to apologize for boring her.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
I repair to the enchanted house, where there are lights, chattering, music, flowers, officers (I am sorry to see), and the eldest Miss Larkins, a blaze of beauty.
David Copperfield - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
enclosespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. include; surround on all sides; close in
At the back of the cottage the land rose steeply, so the back yard was sunken, and enclosed by a low stone wall.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 6
By D H Lawrence Context
Two benches, shaped in sections of a circle, nearly enclosed the hearth; on one of these I stretched myself, and Grimalkin mounted the other.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
He found that it curtained a sort of steep natural stairway which was enclosed between narrow walls, and at once the ambition to be a discoverer seized him.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 31
By Mark Twain Context
endangerspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. threaten; jeopardize; do something that may damage it or destroy it
That they should be man and wife in good time, if the happiness of neither were endangered thereby, was the fancy in question.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
At present I am ready to promise that the instant that I can communicate with you without endangering my own combinations, I shall do so.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The wind being as fierce as ever, we did not care to endanger the light in the lantern by rekindling the extinguished lamps on the staircase, but we examined the staircase from the bottom to the top and found no one there.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
endowspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. grant; award; give qualities or abilities to
Palmer, on the contrary, who was strongly endowed by nature with a turn for being uniformly civil and happy, was hardly seated before her admiration of the parlour and every thing in it burst forth.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
enforcespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. put force upon; force; constrain; compel; put in motion or action by violence
He is connected with the Mafia, which, as you know, is a secret political society, enforcing its decrees by murder.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
For three years the Federal government had been trying to impose alien ideas and an alien rule upon Georgia and, with an army to enforce its commands, it had largely succeeded.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 47
By Margaret Mitche Context
engrossspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. occupy exclusively; absorb; acquire most or all of; write or print the final draft of; make large or larger
Tom was engrossed by the concerns of his theatre, and saw nothing that did not immediately relate to it.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
For the past year, she had been so engrossed in her own woes, so bored by any mention of war, she did not know that from the minute the fighting first began, Atlanta had been transformed.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
engulfspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. absorb or swallow up as in a gulf; flow over or cover completely
As the high watery walls came rolling in, and, at their highest, tumbled into surf, they looked as if the least would engulf the town.
David Copperfield - Chapter 55
By Charles Dickens Context
ensurespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make sure or certain; insure; assure
It was evident that the report concerning her had spread, and a short pause succeeded, which seemed to ensure that it would now spread farther.
Persuasion - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
Jennings could supply to her the conversation she missed; although the latter was an everlasting talker, and from the first had regarded her with a kindness which ensured her a large share of her discourse.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 11
By Jane Austen Context
envyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. malice; ill will; discontent or uneasiness at another's excellence or good fortune, accompanied with hatred
The state of her spirits had probably had its share in her indisposition; for she had been feeling neglected, and been struggling against discontent and envy for some days past.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
I could both see them and hear them talk before I entered, and looked and listened in consequence; being moved thereto by a mingled sense of curiosity and envy, that grew as I lingered.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 32
By Emily Bronte Context
epidemicspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. outbreak of a contagious disease that spreads rapidly and widely; widely prevalent
equatorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the imaginary great circle on the earth's surface, everywhere equally distant from the two poles, and dividing the earth's surface into two hemispheres
establishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. set up or found; build
The calculations of various life assurance and annuity offices, among other figures which cannot go wrong, have established the fact.
Hard Times - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
I may have remarked before that Holmes had, when he liked, a peculiarly ingratiating way with women, and that he very readily established terms of confidence with them.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I had no claim, and I finally resolved, and ever afterwards abided by the resolution, that my heart should never be sickened with the hopeless task of attempting to establish one.
Great Expectations - Chapter 55
By Charles Dickens Context
estimatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. judge to be probable; form an opinion about; evaluate
They tried to estimate how long they had been in the cave, but all they knew was that it seemed days and weeks, and yet it was plain that this could not be, for their candles were not gone yet.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 31
By Mark Twain Context
I have not had so many opportunities of estimating the minuter propensities of his mind, his inclinations and tastes, as you have; but I have the highest opinion in the world of his goodness and sense.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 4
By Jane Austen Context
eternalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. forever; being without beginning or end; existing outside of time; infinite
My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
It seemed a sort of last man among them, musing for a moment before dropping into eternal night with the rest of his race.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
I came into the valley, as the evening sun was shining on the remote heights of snow, that closed it in, like eternal clouds.
David Copperfield - Chapter 58
By Charles Dickens Context
ethnicspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relating to races; group of people sharing common racial, national, or religious heritage
excelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be superior; distinguish oneself
In these accomplishments the twins excelled, and they were equally outstanding in their notorious inability to learn anything contained between the covers of books.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
expansespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. patch; wide and open extent, as of surface, land, or sky
They shot higher and higher and widened rapidly into a broad expanse of red before her terrified eyes.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 23
By Margaret Mitche Context
Others, again, while this was in progress, lifted their eyes and swept the vast expanse of country commanded by their position, now lying nearly obliterated by shade.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
Mary felt as if the drive would never come to an end and that the wide, bleak moor was a wide expanse of black ocean through which she was passing on a strip of dry land.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 3
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
expeditionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. journey organized for a particular purpose
This frightened Oliver very much, and made him glad to get out of those villages with all possible expedition.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
They lay around in the shade, after breakfast, while Huck had a smoke, and then went off through the woods on an exploring expedition.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 14
By Mark Twain Context
The heat of the day had scarcely declined as yet, and she went along the sunny hills at a leisurely pace, there being ample time for her idle expedition.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
expletivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. interjection; word or phrase having no independent meaning; expression usually of surprise or anger
exportspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. sell or transfer abroad; send to another country for sale
There was an improving party assembled on the auspicious occasion, who knew what everything they had to eat and drink was made of, and how it was imported or exported, and in what quantities, and in what bottoms, whether native or foreign, and all about it.
Hard Times - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
extensivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. widespread; far-reaching; wide
There was no other dwelling near, in that direction; and the prospect it commanded was very extensive.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
The prospect in front was more extensive; it commanded the whole of the valley, and reached into the country beyond.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
Dresses were made, jewellery was made, cakes and gloves were made, settlements were made, and an extensive assortment of Facts did appropriate honour to the contract.
Hard Times - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
exterminatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. eliminate; eradicate; kill on a large scale; kill man