9th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 9: With Definition - 4
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 Grade 9: With Definition - 4
extremespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. outermost; utmost; farthest; most remote; at the widest limit
On the extreme verge of the horizon lie a long chain of mountain peaks, with their rugged summits flecked with snow.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
So he took a chop by the bone in one hand, and a potato in the other, and ate away with a very good appetite, to my extreme satisfaction.
David Copperfield - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
I understand that this gentleman, your friend, is a man of honour and discretion, whom I may trust with a matter of the most extreme importance.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
facetspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. small, smooth, flat surface, as on a bone or tooth; side; a smooth surface
The bottom of the vale was green to a width of ten yards or thereabouts, and the shining facets of frost upon the blades of grass seemed to move on with the shadows of those they surrounded.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
factorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. anything that contributes causally to a result; element; variable
But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
faithfulspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. given with strong assurance; firm in adherence to promises or in observance of duty
It was not because I was faithful, but because Joe was faithful, that I never ran away and went for a soldier or a sailor.
Great Expectations - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
Whatever happened she would remain faithful, work hard, carry out the orders that were given to her, and accept the leadership of Napoleon.
Animal Farm - Chapter 7
By George Orwell Context
I told her that I believed she had given me a faithful account of herself, and that we had both been hapless instruments in designing hands.
David Copperfield - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
faminespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. shortage of food; starvation
I wish he could have witnessed the horrible avidity with which Oliver tore the bits asunder with all the ferocity of famine.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
Once again it was being put about that all the animals were dying of famine and disease, and that they were continually fighting among themselves and had resorted to cannibalism and infanticide.
Animal Farm - Chapter 7
By George Orwell Context
farespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. food and drink; diet; transportation charge; a paying passenger
There was no sign or trace of his passenger, and I fear it will be some time before he gets his fare.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
There were apples, yams, peanuts and milk on the table at Tara but never enough of even this primitive fare.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 25
By Margaret Mitche Context
If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before set down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there, and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 47
By Jane Austen Context
fascinatingspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. capable of arousing and holding the attention
These details and accompanying delays worked up an atmosphere of preparation that was as impressive as it was fascinating.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 23
By Mark Twain Context
We have in our police reports realism pushed to its extreme limits, and yet the result is, it must be confessed, neither fascinating nor artistic.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
She had the most delightful little voice, the gayest little laugh, the pleasantest and most fascinating little ways, that ever led a lost youth into hopeless slavery.
David Copperfield - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
fatalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. causing death; leading to failure or disaster
That would be fatal, as only old men and very old ladies could belch without fear of social disapproval.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
We had sprung to our feet, and for a few moments we stared in silent amazement at this ponderous piece of wreckage, which told of some sudden and fatal storm far out on the ocean of life.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
featspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an achievement that requires great courage, skill, or strength; accomplishment
Crupp consented to achieve this feat, on condition that I dined from home for a fortnight afterwards.
David Copperfield - Chapter 28
By Charles Dickens Context
It was the greatest feat of the war, and Atlanta took pride and personal satisfaction in the thought that its railroads had made the victory possible.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
It was not then, but when we had got to the cheese, that our conversation turned upon our rowing feats, and that Drummle was rallied for coming up behind of a night in that slow amphibious way of his.
Great Expectations - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
feeblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. lacking vigor, force, or effectiveness; faint; frail
She gave some feeble signs of returning animation when they entered, and presently the faint transparency was presented in a sitting attitude.
Hard Times - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
At this point of the inquiry, Oliver raised his head; and, looking round with imploring eyes, murmured a feeble prayer for a draught of water.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
He cried, he pleaded for forgiveness, promised to reform over and over again, and then received his dismissal, feeling that he had won but an imperfect forgiveness and established but a feeble confidence.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 10
By Mark Twain Context
felicitousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. apt; suitably expressed; well chosen
The felicitous idea occurred to me a morning or two later when I woke, that the best step I could take towards making myself uncommon was to get out of Biddy everything she knew.
Great Expectations - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
He had remained in Shropshire, lamenting the blindness of his own pride, and the blunders of his own calculations, till at once released from Louisa by the astonishing and felicitous intelligence of her engagement with Benwick.
Persuasion - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
ferociousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. fierce; savage; wild; indicating cruelty
And they never believed her when she told them she had only seen one bloodhound in all her life and it was a small mild dog and not a huge ferocious mastiff.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 38
By Margaret Mitche Context
I was in a state of ferocious virtue, however, as to young men who were not cutting down trees in the forest of difficulty; and my impression must be received with due allowance.
David Copperfield - Chapter 36
By Charles Dickens Context
Dawkins gave his hat a ferocious cock, after delivering this sentiment, and looked at Master Bates, as if to denote that he would feel obliged by his saying anything to the contrary.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
ferryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. shuttle; transport by boat or aircraft
I stayed to dine at a decent alehouse, some mile or two from the Ferry I have mentioned before; and thus the day wore away, and it was evening when I reached it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 31
By Charles Dickens Context
Every little while he locked me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry, and traded fish and game for whisky, and fetched it home and got drunk and had a good time, and licked me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
fertilizerspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any substance used to make soil more fertile
festivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. offering fun and gaiety; joyous; celebratory
On the present festive occasion he emerged from his room, when the blithe bells were going, the picture of misery, in a full suit of Sunday penitentials.
Great Expectations - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
There remained varicolored cotton dresses which Scarlett felt were not festive enough for the occasion, ball dresses and the green sprigged muslin she had worn yesterday.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
fiberspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. slender, elongated, threadlike object or structure; material to make paper or cloth
financespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. management of money and credit and banking and investments; subsidizing; fund
All you ever do is finance Carpetbaggers in their thieving and take half the profits and bribe Yankee officials to let you in on schemes to rob us taxpayers.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 43
By Margaret Mitche Context
So alarming did the state of my finances become, that I soon realized that I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country, or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
firmamentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. fixed foundation; established base; region of the air; sky or heavens; the most remote of the celestial spheres
The distant rims of the world and of the firmament seemed to be a division in time no less than a division in matter.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
Before him and behind: above, below, on the right and on the left: he seemed to stand surrounded by a firmament, all bright with gleaming eyes.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 52
By Charles Dickens Context
fissurespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. long narrow opening ; long narrow depression in surface
flammablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. easily ignited and capable of burning rapidly; inflammable
fluctuatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. rise and fall in or as if in waves; shift; vary irregularly
fluentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. easy and graceful in shape; graceful; smooth and unconstrained in movement
focusspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. most important thing; a fixed reference point; center of interest or activity
Then I did the same for Herbert (who modestly said he had not my administrative genius), and felt that I had brought his affairs into a focus for him.
Great Expectations - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
At present I am, as you know, fairly busy, but I propose to devote my declining years to the composition of a textbook, which shall focus the whole art of detection into one volume.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
foespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. enemy; one who entertains hatred, grudge; adversary
I always thought this was business, this was the way to confront the thing, this was the way to take the foe by the throat.
Great Expectations - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
Suddenly the child she was carrying became a nauseating burden instead of something she had gladly carried, and this man before her, standing carelessly with his wide Panama hat upon his hip, her bitterest foe, the cause of all her troubles.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 56
By Margaret Mitche Context
foulspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act that violates of the rules of a sport
It indicates a spontaneous, Promethean rebelliousness against that fiat that this recurrent season shall bring foul times, cold darkness, misery and death.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
His pride, in that direction, may be of service, if not to himself, to many others, for it must only deter him from such foul misconduct as I have suffered by.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 41
By Jane Austen Context
Their convict uniforms were dirty and foul with sweat, shackles clanked between their ankles when they moved tiredly, and there was an air of apathy and despair about them.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 44
By Margaret Mitche Context
fracasspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. noisy, disorderly fight or quarrel; disturbance
fragrantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having a pleasant or sweet smell; odorous
She could look back, unmoved, at the pretty Scarlett with her fragile green morocco slippers and her flounces fragrant with lavender but she wondered if she could be that same girl.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 29
By Margaret Mitche Context
frailspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. physically weak; easily broken
Perhaps this and her healthy enjoyment of walking and riding had turned him from her to the frail Melanie.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
The walls of his chest seemed to thrill and quiver as a frail building would do inside when some powerful engine was at work.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The nocturnal visitor was a young man, frail and thin, with a black moustache, which intensified the deadly pallor of his face.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
fraudulentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. cheating; deceitful; planning or using fraud; given to practice of fraud
functionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act of executing or performing any duty; assigned duty or activity
Even in their extremity, they had not considered asking a widow of scarcely a year to appear at a social function.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
Such was her intentness, however, that it seemed as if her ears were performing the functions of seeing as well as hearing.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
The principal function of this retainer was to quarrel with the cook; in which respect he was a perfect Whittington, without his cat, or the remotest chance of being made Lord Mayor.
David Copperfield - Chapter 48
By Charles Dickens Context
fusespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. combine; blend; become plastic or fluid or liquefied from heat
In this atmosphere, as nerve straining as watching a slow fuse burn toward a barrel of gunpowder, Scarlett came rapidly back to strength.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 42
By Margaret Mitche Context
fussspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. angry disturbance; excited state of agitation; needlessly nervous or useless activity; protest; quarrel
gaitspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. manner of walking or stepping; bearing or carriage while moving; walk; rate of moving
By the time she caught sight of the Leyden house, she was beginning to pant, for her stays were tightly laced, but she did not slow her gait.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 21
By Margaret Mitche Context
They were walking slowly; and though it was too dark for much discovery of character from aspect, the gait of them showed that they were not workers on the heath.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
gallantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. courtly; lively and spirited; having or displaying great dignity or nobility
My child, Sherman has twice as many men as Johnston, and he can afford to lose two men for every one of our gallant laddies.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 17
By Margaret Mitche Context
Without considering, perhaps, whether there were any consequences to be taken, I felt quite in a glow at this gallant speech.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
As she sat down, her eyes once again encountered those of the gallant beadle; she coloured, and applied herself to the task of making his tea.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
gambolspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. dance and skip about in sport; leap playfully
And finally there was a tremendous baying of dogs and a shrill crowing from the black cockerel, and out came Napoleon himself, majestically upright, casting haughty glances from side to side, and with his dogs gambolling round him.
Animal Farm - Chapter 10
By George Orwell Context
gamutspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. entire range; all notes in musical scale
garmentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any article of clothing, as coat or gown
At the head of the column there rode a score or more of grave ironfaced men, clad in sombre homespun garments and armed with rifles.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He put his hand on his jacket pocket, found his piece of bark safe, and then struck through the woods, following the shore, with streaming garments.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 15
By Mark Twain Context
Rhett had brought her that linen and lace from Nassau on the last boat he slipped through the blockade and she had worked a week to make the garment.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 24
By Margaret Mitche Context
gauchespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. awkward or lacking in social graces; coarse and uncouth
geniusspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. exceptional creative ability; unusual mental ability; someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field
He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was by no means such a phenomenon as Poe appeared to imagine.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
To continue in fistic phraseology, he had a genius for coming up to the scratch, wherever and whatever it was, and proving himself an ugly customer.
Hard Times - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
Thus it was that we parted without explanation: she waving her hand and smiling farewell from the coach window; her evil genius writhing on the roof, as if he had her in his clutches and triumphed.
David Copperfield - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
genuinespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. authentic; sincerely and honestly felt or experienced; real or true
It was a genuine relief to the whole congregation when the ordeal was over and the benediction pronounced.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 5
By Mark Twain Context
Her features were handsome; but their natural play was so locked up, that it seemed impossible to guess at their genuine expression.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
Then she could gradually rise up to the genuine satisfaction of having a partner, a voluntary partner, secured against the dancing began.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 28
By Jane Austen Context
glamourspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. air of compelling charm, romance, and excitement, especially when delusively alluring; magic spell
It was quite true, men had no real glamour for a woman: if you could fool yourself into thinking they had, even as she had fooled herself over Michaelis, that was the best you could do.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 6
By D H Lawrence Context
Yet when I think of him in cold blood, far away from the glamour of his presence, I am convinced from his cynical speech and the look which I have caught in his eyes that he is one who should be deeply distrusted.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
glarespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. light; brightness; fierce or angry stare
The speaker was a woman, gazing down upon the group from an upper window, whose panes blazed in the ruddy glare from the west.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
In front of him, in the full glare of the electric light, there stood a tall, slim, dark woman, a veil over her face, a mantle drawn round her chin.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It was a pleasant land of white houses, peaceful plowed fields and sluggish yellow rivers, but a land of contrasts, of brightest sun glare and densest shade.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
gourmetspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. person with discriminating taste in food and wine
gradualspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. proceeding by steps or degrees; advancing, step by step, as in ascent or descent or from one state to another; regularly progressive
As the weeks went by, my interest in him and my curiosity as to his aims in life, gradually deepened and increased.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Gradually the cool dim gray of the morning whitened, and as gradually sounds multiplied and life manifested itself.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 14
By Mark Twain Context
At last, as midnight approached and the street gradually cleared, he paced up and down the room in uncontrollable agitation.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
grovespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. group of trees smaller than a forest; orchard
A heavily timbered park stretched up in a gentle slope, thickening into a grove at the highest point.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Scarlett knew that the fragrance carried on the faint breeze came from the grove of great oaks in the rear of the big house.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
Having obtained from this clerk a direction to the academic grove in question, I set out, the same afternoon, to visit my old schoolfellow.
David Copperfield - Chapter 27
By Charles Dickens Context
grudgespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be unwilling or reluctant to give or admit; be envious; show discontent
After that, Melanie noticed there was more food on the table when guests were present, even though Scarlett might grudge them every mouthful.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 30
By Margaret Mitche Context
You may possibly remember that you chaffed me a little, some hours ago, when the sun seemed on your side of the hedge, so you must not grudge me a little pomp and ceremony now.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Every mouthful of food was an acute positive pleasure, now that it was truly their own food, produced by themselves and for themselves, not doled out to them by a grudging master.
Animal Farm - Chapter 3
By George Orwell Context
gruelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. liquid food made by boiling oatmeal
Linton, on the third day, unbarred her door, and having finished the water in her pitcher and decanter, desired a renewed supply, and a basin of gruel, for she believed she was dying.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 12
By Emily Bronte Context
The room in which the boys were fed, was a large stone hall, with a copper at one end: out of which the master, dressed in an apron for the purpose, and assisted by one or two women, ladled the gruel at mealtimes.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
grumblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. utter or emit low dull rumbling sounds
He said it in his grumbling voice, and then quite suddenly he seemed to get angry with her, though she did not see why he should.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 10
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Fortifying himself with this assurance, Sikes drained the glass to the bottom, and then, with many grumbling oaths, called for his physic.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 39
By Charles Dickens Context
Nobody stole, nobody grumbled over his rations, the quarrelling and biting and jealousy which had been normal features of life in the old days had almost disappeared.
Animal Farm - Chapter 3
By George Orwell Context
guilelessspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. free from deceit; sincere; honest
This guileless confectioner was not by any means sober, and had a black eye in the green stage of recovery, which was painted over.
Great Expectations - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
With old ladies you were sweet and guileless and appeared as simple minded as possible, for old ladies were sharp and they watched girls as jealously as cats, ready to pounce on any indiscretion of tongue or eye.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
hangarspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. shelter especially for housing or repairing aircraft
hatchspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. breed; emerge from the egg
The older, quieter cities were wont to look upon the bustling new town with the sensations of a hen which has hatched a duckling.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
It appeared to me that the eggs from which young Insurers were hatched were incubated in dust and heat, like the eggs of ostriches, judging from the places to which those incipient giants repaired on a Monday morning.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
A stump of hay and part of the potato crop were sold off, and the contract for eggs was increased to six hundred a week, so that that year the hens barely hatched enough chicks to keep their numbers at the same level.
Animal Farm - Chapter 9
By George Orwell Context
havenspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. refuge; shelter; harbor or anchorage; port
THIS is not the place to commemorate the trials and privations endured by the immigrant Mormons before they came to their final haven.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Some, like Ellen, were members of old families who had found life intolerable in their former homes and sought haven in a distant land.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
hazardousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. dangerous; reckless; daring; inclined to run risks
He had sold his boats when blockading grew too hazardous, and he was now openly engaged in food speculation.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
hazyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. slightly obscure; unclear, confused, or uncertain
His talk of shadow shows and hazy outlines conveyed no meaning to her but his last words were in language she could understand.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 31
By Margaret Mitche Context
The solitary window was so dirty that the light was hazy and uncertain, giving a dull grey tinge to everything, which was intensified by the thick layer of dust which coated the whole apartment.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I shall call hills steep, which ought to be bold; surfaces strange and uncouth, which ought to be irregular and rugged; and distant objects out of sight, which ought only to be indistinct through the soft medium of a hazy atmosphere.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
hecticspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. feverish; very busy with activity and confusion; habitual; marking particular habit or condition of body
herbivorousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. grain-eating; plant-eating; feeding only on plants
hingespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
Then with his lens he tested the hinges, but they were of solid iron, built firmly into the massive masonry.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
At the same instant the bookcase at which Holmes pointed swung round upon a hinge, and a woman rushed out into the room.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
My little portmanteau was in the boot under my feet; I had but to turn a hinge to get it out; I threw it down before me, got down after it, and was left at the first lamp on the first stones of the town pavement.
Great Expectations - Chapter 28
By Charles Dickens Context
hobblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. walk lame, bearing chiefly on one leg; walk with a hitch or hop, or with crutches; move roughly or irregularly
At my summons, instead of the man of violence whom we expected, a very old and wrinkled woman hobbled into the apartment.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Bidding the messenger walk fast, and not be all night hobbling up the stairs, she followed her from the room with a very ill grace, scolding all the way.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
And as if a wind tossed him he got up and hobbled over to her, one shoe off and one shoe on, and took her in his arms, pressing her against his body, which somehow felt hurt right through.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 14
By D H Lawrence Context
hordespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a large group or crowd; wandering troop or gang; a moving crowd
hospitablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. disposed to treat guests with warmth and generosity; receptive
Mr and Mrs Musgrove were a very good sort of people; friendly and hospitable, not much educated, and not at all elegant.
Persuasion - Chapter 5
By Jane Austen Context
Peggotty and Ham knew what was in my thoughts as well as I did, and were ready with some supper and their hospitable faces to drive it away.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
hospitalityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act or practice of one who is hospitable; reception and entertainment of strangers or guests without reward
The house was large and handsome; and the Middletons lived in a style of equal hospitality and elegance.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
The old portraits on the walls had been dignified and gracious and had looked down upon guests with an air of mellowed hospitality.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 35
By Margaret Mitche Context
It has often led him to be liberal and generous, to give his money freely, to display hospitality, to assist his tenants, and relieve the poor.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 16
By Jane Austen Context
hostagespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. prisoner who is held by one party to insure that another party will meet specified terms