EVENING in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables (V2) by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - evening in Les Misérables (V2)
1  Towards six o'clock in the evening they reached Chelles.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI—WHICH POSSIBLY PROVES BOULATRUELLE'S ...
2  The search was continued until the evening: they did not even find the body.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III—THE ANKLE-CHAIN MUST HAVE UNDERGONE A CERTAIN ...
3  At that age, and on that boulevard, eight o'clock in the evening was the dead of the night.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER V—A FIVE-FRANC PIECE FALLS ON THE GROUND AND ...
4  On the evening of the day when Jean Valjean rescued Cosette from the claws of the Thenardiers, he returned to Paris.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XI—NUMBER 9,430 REAPPEARS, AND COSETTE WINS IT IN ...
5  At twilight, towards nine o'clock in the evening, one of them was left at the foot of the plateau of Mont-Saint-Jean.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV—THE LAST SQUARE
6  It was this good woman who had lighted the fire in the stove, and prepared everything on the evening of their arrival.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER III—TWO MISFORTUNES MAKE ONE PIECE OF GOOD ...
7  Behind these beds, and half hidden, stood an uncurtained wicker cradle, in which the little boy who had cried all the evening lay asleep.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII—THE UNPLEASANTNESS OF RECEIVING INTO ONE'S ...
8  One evening, as Jean Valjean was passing by, when he had not Cosette with him, he saw the beggar in his usual place, beneath the lantern which had just been lighted.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER V—A FIVE-FRANC PIECE FALLS ON THE GROUND AND ...
9  He was encountered towards evening in the most deserted clearings, in the wildest thickets; and he had the appearance of being in search of something, and sometimes he was digging holes.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH THE READER WILL PERUSE TWO VERSES, ...
10  Every evening, at twilight, he walked for an hour or two, sometimes alone, often with Cosette, seeking the most deserted side alleys of the boulevard, and entering churches at nightfall.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER IV—THE REMARKS OF THE PRINCIPAL TENANT
11  Ever since the preceding evening, amid all her amazement, even in her sleep, she had been thinking in her little childish mind of that man who seemed to be so poor and so sad, and who was so rich and so kind.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX—THENARDIER AND HIS MANOEUVRES
12  While drinking with the carters, smoking, and singing coarse songs on the preceding evening, he had devoted the whole of the time to observing the stranger, watching him like a cat, and studying him like a mathematician.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX—THENARDIER AND HIS MANOEUVRES
13  All this was prepared beforehand on the table, and, as he had done on the previous evening, he began to scrutinize Cosette's face with a gaze full of ecstasy, in which the expression of kindness and tenderness almost amounted to aberration.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER II—A NEST FOR OWL AND A WARBLER
14  The third station, the one adopted at seven o'clock in the evening, between La Belle-Alliance and La Haie-Sainte, is formidable; it is a rather elevated knoll, which still exists, and behind which the guard was massed on a slope of the plain.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VII—NAPOLEON IN A GOOD HUMOR
15  But, on the evening of that day, he saw, without being seen himself, as he was hidden by a large tree, "a person who did not belong in those parts, and whom he, Boulatruelle, knew well," directing his steps towards the densest part of the wood.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH THE READER WILL PERUSE TWO VERSES, ...
16  At daybreak, just as he was falling into a doze through fatigue, he was awakened by the creaking of a door which opened on some attic at the end of the corridor, then he heard the same masculine footstep which had ascended the stairs on the preceding evening.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER V—A FIVE-FRANC PIECE FALLS ON THE GROUND AND ...
17  In order to get a close look at this fantastic gentleman without alarming him, he borrowed the beadle's outfit for a day, and the place where the old spy was in the habit of crouching every evening, whining orisons through his nose, and playing the spy under cover of prayer.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER X—WHICH EXPLAINS HOW JAVERT GOT ON THE SCENT
18  One almost had a presentiment of meeting with traps in that darkness; all the confused forms of the darkness seemed suspicious, and the long, hollow square, of which one caught a glimpse between each tree, seemed graves: by day it was ugly; in the evening melancholy; by night it was sinister.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—MASTER GORBEAU
19  One evening the schoolmaster affirmed that in former times the law would have instituted an inquiry as to what Boulatruelle did in the forest, and that the latter would have been forced to speak, and that he would have been put to the torture in case of need, and that Boulatruelle would not have resisted the water test, for example.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH THE READER WILL PERUSE TWO VERSES, ...
20  Then it is seen that the man is simply a peasant, that he appears black because it is nightfall; that he is not digging any hole whatever, but is cutting grass for his cows, and that what had been taken for horns is nothing but a dung-fork which he is carrying on his back, and whose teeth, thanks to the perspective of evening, seemed to spring from his head.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH THE READER WILL PERUSE TWO VERSES, ...