FLOWER in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables (V3) by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - flower in Les Misérables (V3)
1  These flowers were his occupation.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II—ONE OF THE RED SPECTRES OF THAT EPOCH
2  The neighbors devastated the garden and pillaged the rare flowers.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV—END OF THE BRIGAND
3  Mabeuf talked to him of his hero from the point of view of flowers.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER IV—M. MABEUF
4  Marius approached her and purchased the finest flowers in her flat basket.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII—SOME PETTICOAT
5  The father had yielded in the little one's interest, and had transferred his love to flowers.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II—ONE OF THE RED SPECTRES OF THAT EPOCH
6  As three days in April suffice to cover certain trees with flowers, six months had sufficed to clothe her with beauty.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—LUX FACTA EST
7  The plot of earth which he called his garden was celebrated in the town for the beauty of the flowers which he cultivated there.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II—ONE OF THE RED SPECTRES OF THAT EPOCH
8  Church-warden Mabeuf, whom he went to see again, told him about the life at Vernon, the colonel's retreat, his flowers, his solitude.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI—THE CONSEQUENCES OF HAVING MET A WARDEN
9  A little peasant girl, all entangled with the horses and the postilions at the end of the vehicle, was offering flowers to the travellers.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII—SOME PETTICOAT
10  He goes to the spectacles which God furnishes gratis; he gazes at the sky, space, the stars, flowers, children, the humanity among which he is suffering, the creation amid which he beams.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER III—MARIUS GROWN UP
11  Souls which blossomed out yesterday, and are faded to-day, like those flowers let fall in the streets, which are soiled with every sort of mire, while waiting for some wheel to crush them.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER IV—A ROSE IN MISERY
12  He hardly saw the roses, he ignored spring, he did not hear the carolling of the birds; the bare throat of Evadne would have moved him no more than it would have moved Aristogeiton; he, like Harmodius, thought flowers good for nothing except to conceal the sword.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—A GROUP WHICH BARELY MISSED BECOMING HISTORIC
13  Curled, pomaded, with laced waist, the hips of a woman, the bust of a Prussian officer, the murmur of admiration from the boulevard wenches surrounding him, his cravat knowingly tied, a bludgeon in his pocket, a flower in his buttonhole; such was this dandy of the sepulchre.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—BABET, GUEULEMER, CLAQUESOUS, AND ...
14  The youngest had a charming soul, which turned towards all that belongs to the light, was occupied with flowers, with verses, with music, which fluttered away into glorious space, enthusiastic, ethereal, and was wedded from her very youth, in ideal, to a vague and heroic figure.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII—TWO DO NOT MAKE A PAIR
15  Jean Prouvaire was in love; he cultivated a pot of flowers, played on the flute, made verses, loved the people, pitied woman, wept over the child, confounded God and the future in the same confidence, and blamed the Revolution for having caused the fall of a royal head, that of Andre Chenier.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—A GROUP WHICH BARELY MISSED BECOMING HISTORIC
16  All purities and all candors meet in that celestial and fatal gleam which, more than all the best-planned tender glances of coquettes, possesses the magic power of causing the sudden blossoming, in the depths of the soul, of that sombre flower, impregnated with perfume and with poison, which is called love.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER III—EFFECT OF THE SPRING