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Quotes of GARDEN from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

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The garden sloping to the road, the house standing in it, the green pales, and the laurel hedge, everything declared they were arriving.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 28   Context
Collins invited them to take a stroll in the garden, which was large and well laid out, and to the cultivation of which he attended himself.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 28   Context
To work in this garden was one of his most respectable pleasures; and Elizabeth admired the command of countenance with which Charlotte talked of the healthfulness of the exercise, and owned she encouraged it as much as possible.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 28   Context
But of all the views which his garden, or which the country or kingdom could boast, none were to be compared with the prospect of Rosings, afforded by an opening in the trees that bordered the park nearly opposite the front of his house.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 28   Context
The house is by no means bad, and when the yard is removed, there may be a very tolerable approach to it.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXV   Context
I am not fond of the idea of my shrubberies being always approachable; and I should recommend Miss Elliot to be on her guard with respect to her flower garden.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 3   Context
In such employments as these they were interrupted soon after breakfast the next day by the entrance of their landlord, who called to welcome them to Barton, and to offer them every accommodation from his own house and garden in which theirs might at present be deficient.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 6   Context
His kindness was not confined to words; for within an hour after he left them, a large basket full of garden stuff and fruit arrived from the park, which was followed before the end of the day by a present of game.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 6   Context
The house and the garden, with all the objects surrounding them, were now become familiar, and the ordinary pursuits which had given to Norland half its charms were engaged in again with far greater enjoyment than Norland had been able to afford, since the loss of their father.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 9   Context
One consolation however remained for them, to which the exigence of the moment gave more than usual propriety; it was that of running with all possible speed down the steep side of the hill which led immediately to their garden gate.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 9   Context
Then passing through the garden, the gate of which had been left open by Margaret, he bore her directly into the house, whither Margaret was just arrived, and quitted not his hold till he had seated her in a chair in the parlour.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 9   Context
It also boasted of what in Languedoc is styled a garden, consisting of a small plot of ground, on the side opposite to the main entrance reserved for the reception of guests.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 26. The Pont du Gard Inn   Context
The truth was, that Luigi had not felt the strength to support another such trial, and, half by persuasion and half by force, he had removed Teresa toward another part of the garden.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 33. Roman Bandits   Context
Two windows only of the pavilion faced the street; three other windows looked into the court, and two at the back into the garden.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 39. The Guests   Context
Between the court and the garden, built in the heavy style of the imperial architecture, was the large and fashionable dwelling of the Count and Countess of Morcerf.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 39. The Guests   Context
This is not a Corsican arbor, but an English garden; badly kept, I own, but still you must not calumniate it for that.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 43. The House at Auteuil   Context
Turn Chartreux or Trappist, and relate your secrets, but, as for me, I do not like any one who is alarmed by such phantasms, and I do not choose that my servants should be afraid to walk in the garden of an evening.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 43. The House at Auteuil   Context
Three hours later, the man returned covered with dust, his errand was performed, and two minutes after, another man on foot, muffled in a mantle, opened the little door of the garden, which he closed after him.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 44. The Vendetta   Context
I crossed the street, and stopped at a post placed at the angle of the wall, and by means of which I had once before looked into the garden.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 44. The Vendetta   Context
The garden was long and narrow; a stretch of smooth turf extended down the middle, and at the corners were clumps of trees with thick and massy foliage, that made a background for the shrubs and flowers.
Alexandre Dumas
The Count of Monte Cristo, Chapter 44. The Vendetta   Context
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