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Quotes of IMAGINATION from Leo Tolstoy

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And again every detail of his quarrel with his wife was present to his imagination, all the hopelessness of his position, and worst of all, his own fault.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 1: Chapter 1   Context
His conception of her was for him a sacred memory, and his future wife was bound to be in his imagination a repetition of that exquisite, holy ideal of a woman that his mother had been.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 1: Chapter 27   Context
He was reading a book, and thinking of what he was reading, and stopping to listen to Agafea Mihalovna, who gossiped away without flagging, and yet with all that, all sorts of pictures of family life and work in the future rose disconnectedly before his imagination.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 1: Chapter 27   Context
But in that nervous tension, and in the visions that filled her imagination, there was nothing disagreeable or gloomy: on the contrary there was something blissful, glowing, and exhilarating.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 1: Chapter 30   Context
He thought of nothing but that he would see her directly, not in imagination, but living, all of her, as she was in reality.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 2: Chapter 22   Context
He was thinking now with pleasure and excitement of the race, of his being anyhow, in time, and now and then the thought of the blissful interview awaiting him that night flashed across his imagination like a flaming light.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 2: Chapter 24   Context
Recognizing these persons as Russians, Kitty had already in her imagination begun constructing a delightful and touching romance about them.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 2: Chapter 30   Context
It seemed to her that the words that she had spoken to her husband, and had continually repeated in her imagination, she had said to everyone, and everyone had heard them.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 3: Chapter 15   Context
His conception of her was for him a sacred memory, and his future wife was bound to be in his imagination a repetition of that exquisite, holy ideal of a woman that his mother had been.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 1: Chapter 27   Context
When he was back in the carriage, he kept unceasingly going over every position in which he had seen her, every word she had uttered, and before his fancy, making his heart faint with emotion, floated pictures of a possible future.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 1: Chapter 31   Context
And they beheld a pretty woman in a hired sledge; she overtakes them, looks round at them, and, so they fancy anyway, nods to them and laughs.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 2: Chapter 5   Context
This was so simply said, and so sweet was the truthful and candid expression of her face, that the princess saw why Kitty had taken such a fancy to Varenka.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V1), PART 2: Chapter 31   Context
She was, every time she saw him, making the picture of him in her imagination (incomparably superior, impossible in reality) fit with him as he really was.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 4: Chapter 2   Context
He gazed at the cross, then at the stars, drank in the fresh freezing air that flowed evenly into the room, and followed as though in a dream the images and memories that rose in his imagination.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 4: Chapter 14   Context
Alexey Alexandrovitch, like Lidia Ivanovna indeed, and others who shared their views, was completely devoid of vividness of imagination, that spiritual faculty in virtue of which the conceptions evoked by the imagination become so vivid that they must needs be in harmony with other conceptions, and with actual fact.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 5: Chapter 22   Context
And as she got nearer to Petersburg, the delight and importance of this meeting grew ever greater in her imagination.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 5: Chapter 29   Context
To be the wife of a man like Koznishev, after her position with Madame Stahl, was to her imagination the height of happiness.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 6: Chapter 5   Context
The memories of home and of her children rose up in her imagination with a peculiar charm quite new to her, with a sort of new brilliance.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 6: Chapter 24   Context
The members of this deputation had not the slightest conception of their duty and the part they were to play.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 4: Chapter 8   Context
There was the same conception of the senselessness of everything to come in life, the same consciousness of humiliation.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V2), PART 4: Chapter 18   Context
The whole world of woman, which had taken for him since his marriage a new value he had never suspected before, was now so exalted that he could not take it in in his imagination.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V3), PART 7: Chapter 16   Context
All the most cruel words that a brutal man could say, he said to her in her imagination, and she could not forgive him for them, as though he had actually said them.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V3), PART 7: Chapter 26   Context
And in the contemplation of this sublime something the soul was exalted to inconceivable heights of which it had before had no conception, while reason lagged behind, unable to keep up with it.
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina(V3), PART 7: Chapter 14   Context
I never could understand the fondness some people have for confusing their minds by dwelling on mystical books that merely awaken their doubts and excite their imagination, giving them a bent for exaggeration quite contrary to Christian simplicity.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V1), BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXV   Context
A husband, a man, a strong dominant and strangely attractive being rose in her imagination, and carried her into a totally different happy world of his own.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V1), BOOK 3: CHAPTER III   Context
Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V1), BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV   Context
And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V1), BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII   Context
When the little princess had grown accustomed to life at Bald Hills, she took a special fancy to Mademoiselle Bourienne, spent whole days with her, asked her to sleep in her room, and often talked with her about the old prince and criticized him.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V1), BOOK 3: CHAPTER III   Context
Now and then his attention wandered from the book and the Square and he formed in imagination a new plan of life.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V2), BOOK 5: CHAPTER V   Context
My benefactor then explained to me fully the meaning of the Great Square of creation and pointed out to me that the numbers three and seven are the basis of everything.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V2), BOOK 6: CHAPTER VIII   Context
What she drew from the guitar would have had no meaning for other listeners, but in her imagination a whole series of reminiscences arose from those sounds.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V3), BOOK 7: CHAPTER IX   Context
And again in imagination she went over her whole conversation with Kuragin, and again saw the face, gestures, and tender smile of that bold handsome man when he pressed her arm.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V3), BOOK 8: CHAPTER X   Context
He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V3), BOOK 8: CHAPTER XIX   Context
From this short interview with Pfuel, Prince Andrew, thanks to his Austerlitz experiences, was able to form a clear conception of the man.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V3), BOOK 9: CHAPTER X   Context
Occasionally amid these memories temptations of the devil would surge into her imagination: thoughts of how things would be after his death, and how her new, liberated life would be ordered.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 10: CHAPTER VIII   Context
With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 10: CHAPTER XII   Context
In his imagination he appointed days for assemblies at the palace of the Tsars, at which Russian notables and his own would mingle.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 11: CHAPTER XIX   Context
As is often the case with those gifted with an ardent imagination, though he had long known that Moscow would be abandoned he knew it only with his intellect, he did not believe it in his heart and did not adapt himself mentally to this new position of affairs.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 11: CHAPTER XXIV   Context
Only when we have admitted the conception of the infinitely small, and the resulting geometrical progression with a common ratio of one tenth, and have found the sum of this progression to infinity, do we reach a solution of the problem.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 11: CHAPTER I   Context
In his fancy he did not clearly picture to himself either the striking of the blow or the death of Napoleon, but with extraordinary vividness and melancholy enjoyment imagined his own destruction and heroic endurance.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 11: CHAPTER XXVII   Context
Makar Alexeevich, frowning with exertion, held on to the pistol and screamed hoarsely, evidently with some heroic fancy in his head.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V4), BOOK 11: CHAPTER XXVII   Context
Those dreadful moments he had lived through at the executions had as it were forever washed away from his imagination and memory the agitating thoughts and feelings that had formerly seemed so important.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V5), BOOK 13: CHAPTER XII   Context
Pierre stood pressed against the wall of a charred house, listening to that noise which mingled in his imagination with the roll of the drums.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V5), BOOK 13: CHAPTER XIV   Context
But it is hard to understand why military writers, and following them others, consider this flank march to be the profound conception of some one man who saved Russia and destroyed Napoleon.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V5), BOOK 13: CHAPTER I   Context
Pierre smiled, Natasha began to laugh, but Nicholas knitted his brows still more and began proving to Pierre that there was no prospect of any great change and that all the danger he spoke of existed only in his imagination.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 16: CHAPTER XIV   Context
If history had retained the conception of the ancients it would have said that God, to reward or punish his people, gave Napoleon power and directed his will to the fulfillment of the divine ends, and that reply would have been clear and complete.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER I   Context
Science does not admit the conception of the ancients as to the direct participation of the Deity in human affairs, and therefore history ought to give other answers.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER I   Context
Yet in most cases universal historians still employ the conception of power as a force that itself produces events, and treat it as their cause.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER II   Context
The only conception that can explain the movement of the locomotive is that of a force commensurate with the movement observed.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER III   Context
The only conception that can explain the movement of the peoples is that of some force commensurate with the whole movement of the peoples.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER III   Context
Yet to supply this conception various historians take forces of different kinds, all of which are incommensurate with the movement observed.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER III   Context
The necessity of the conception of power as an explanation of historical events is best demonstrated by the universal historians and historians of culture themselves, for they professedly reject that conception but inevitably have recourse to it at every step.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER III   Context
Not to speak of the fact that no description of the collective activity of men can do without the conception of power, the existence of power is proved both by history and by observing contemporary events.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER V   Context
This relation of the men who command to those they command is what constitutes the essence of the conception called power.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER VI   Context
Every man, savage or sage, however incontestably reason and experiment may prove to him that it is impossible to imagine two different courses of action in precisely the same conditions, feels that without this irrational conception (which constitutes the essence of freedom) he cannot imagine life.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER VIII   Context
He feels that however impossible it may be, it is so, for without this conception of freedom not only would he be unable to understand life, but he would be unable to live for a single moment.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER VIII   Context
If the conception of freedom appears to reason to be a senseless contradiction like the possibility of performing two actions at one and the same instant of time, or of an effect without a cause, that only proves that consciousness is not subject to reason.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER VIII   Context
This unshakable, irrefutable consciousness of freedom, uncontrolled by experiment or argument, recognized by all thinkers and felt by everyone without exception, this consciousness without which no conception of man is possible constitutes the other side of the question.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER VIII   Context
Our conception of the degree of freedom often varies according to differences in the point of view from which we regard the event, but every human action appears to us as a certain combination of freedom and inevitability.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
In all these cases the conception of freedom is increased or diminished and the conception of compulsion is correspondingly decreased or increased, according to the point of view from which the action is regarded.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
So that the greater the conception of necessity the smaller the conception of freedom and vice versa.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
All cases without exception in which our conception of freedom and necessity is increased and diminished depend on three considerations:.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
And the more we perceive of these influences the more our conception of his freedom diminishes and the more our conception of the necessity that weighs on him increases.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
The degree of our conception of freedom or inevitability depends in this respect on the greater or lesser lapse of time between the performance of the action and our judgment of it.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
If we examined simple actions and had a vast number of such actions under observation, our conception of their inevitability would be still greater.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
On these three considerations alone is based the conception of irresponsibility for crimes and the extenuating circumstances admitted by all legislative codes.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER IX   Context
If we examine a man little dependent on external conditions, whose action was performed very recently, and the causes of whose action are beyond our ken, we get the conception of a minimum of inevitability and a maximum of freedom.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER X   Context
Apart from these two concepts which in their union mutually define one another as form and content, no conception of life is possible.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER X   Context
If there is even a single body moving freely, then the laws of Kepler and Newton are negatived and no conception of the movement of the heavenly bodies any longer exists.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER XI   Context
If any single action is due to free will, then not a single historical law can exist, nor any conception of historical events.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER XI   Context
Abandoning the conception of cause, mathematics seeks law, that is, the property common to all unknown, infinitely small, elements.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER XI   Context
By disproving that law it might have been possible to retain the old conception of the movements of the bodies, but without disproving it, it would seem impossible to continue studying the Ptolemaic worlds.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER XII   Context
Just as prolonged and stubborn is the struggle now proceeding between the old and the new conception of history, and theology in the same way stands on guard for the old view, and accuses the new view of subverting revelation.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER XII   Context
Just so it now seems as if we have only to admit the law of inevitability, to destroy the conception of the soul, of good and evil, and all the institutions of state and church that have been built up on those conceptions.
Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace(V6), BOOK 17: CHAPTER XII   Context
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