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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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1  Do not let us quarrel about the past.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
2  If it be not so, let Mr. Darcy contradict it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
3  But as it is, you must not let your fancy run away with you.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
4  My dear madam," replied he, "let us be for ever silent on this point.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
5  "Pray let me hear what you have to accuse him of," cried Colonel Fitzwilliam.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
6  And in the first place, let us hear what has happened to you all since you went away.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 39
7  But if he does it any more I shall certainly let him know that I see what he is about.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  Do let the portraits of your uncle and aunt Phillips be placed in the gallery at Pemberley.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
9  Miss Eliza Bennet, let me persuade you to follow my example, and take a turn about the room.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
10  "Do let us have a little music," cried Miss Bingley, tired of a conversation in which she had no share.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
11  How thankful am I that we never let them know what has been said against him; we must forget it ourselves.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
12  Only let me assure you, my dear Miss Elizabeth, that I can from my heart most cordially wish you equal felicity in marriage.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
13  Don't think me angry, however, for I only mean to let you know that I had not imagined such inquiries to be necessary on your side.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
14  And as for wedding clothes, do not let them wait for that, but tell Lydia she shall have as much money as she chooses to buy them, after they are married.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
15  But when they had withdrawn, he said to her: "Mrs. Bennet, before you take any or all of these houses for your son and daughter, let us come to a right understanding."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
16  In a few days more we may gain some news of them; and till we know that they are not married, and have no design of marrying, do not let us give the matter over as lost.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
17  Choose properly, choose a gentlewoman for my sake; and for your own, let her be an active, useful sort of person, not brought up high, but able to make a small income go a good way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
18  By all means," cried Bingley; "let us hear all the particulars, not forgetting their comparative height and size; for that will have more weight in the argument, Miss Bennet, than you may be aware of.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
19  As for Elizabeth herself, this invitation was so far from exciting in her the same feelings as in her mother and Lydia, that she considered it as the death warrant of all possibility of common sense for the latter; and detestable as such a step must make her were it known, she could not help secretly advising her father not to let her go.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
20  But amidst your concern for the defects of your nearest relations, and your displeasure at this representation of them, let it give you consolation to consider that, to have conducted yourselves so as to avoid any share of the like censure, is praise no less generally bestowed on you and your elder sister, than it is honourable to the sense and disposition of both.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35