LITTLE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables (V4) by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - little in Les Misérables (V4)
1  This little pellet falls in the yard.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II—EMBRYONIC FORMATION OF CRIMES IN THE ...
2  Let us, therefore, reckon a little on the herd.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI—ENJOLRAS AND HIS LIEUTENANTS
3  He went a little to chapel, not at all to the chase, never to the opera.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III—LOUIS PHILIPPE
4  Bossuet will take a little turn in the court and talk with the young law licentiates.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI—ENJOLRAS AND HIS LIEUTENANTS
5  There is urgent need that some one should go and talk with them a little, but with firmness.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI—ENJOLRAS AND HIS LIEUTENANTS
6  Ordinarily, this flame which burns us lights us also a little, and casts some useful gleams without.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I—THE LARK'S MEADOW
7  The experiments on indigo had not been successful in the little garden of Austerlitz, which had a bad exposure.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III—APPARITION TO FATHER MABEUF
8  A mason returning from his day's work, left behind him a little package on a bench near the bridge of Austerlitz.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V—FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY ...
9  The Revolution of July, which gained but little acceptance outside of France by kings, had been diversely interpreted in France, as we have said.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV—CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
10  A strange shade, gradually drawing nearer, extended little by little over men, over things, over ideas; a shade which came from wraths and systems.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV—CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
11  On leaving the convent, he took in his own arms the little valise the key to which he still wore on his person, and would permit no porter to touch it.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I—THE HOUSE WITH A SECRET
12  As for Marius, "that booby of a lawyer," who had probably become frightened, and whose name Javert had forgotten, Javert attached very little importance to him.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II—EMBRYONIC FORMATION OF CRIMES IN THE ...
13  He had dined on a bone, on which a little meat lingered, and a bit of bread that he had found on the kitchen table, and had seated himself on an overturned stone post, which took the place of a bench in his garden.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III—APPARITION TO FATHER MABEUF
14  Louis Philippe will be classed among the eminent men of his century, and would be ranked among the most illustrious governors of history had he loved glory but a little, and if he had had the sentiment of what is great to the same degree as the feeling for what is useful.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III—LOUIS PHILIPPE
15  In civilization, such as it has formed itself, a little by the command of God, a great deal by the agency of man, interests combine, unite, and amalgamate in a manner to form a veritable hard rock, in accordance with a dynamic law, patiently studied by economists, those geologists of politics.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV—CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
16  The fact, even when most necessary to all appearances, even when most thoroughly accepted by contemporaries, if it exist only as a fact, and if it contain only too little of right, or none at all, is infallibly destined to become, in the course of time, deformed, impure, perhaps, even monstrous.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
17  Later on, he had sold in little parcels, for gardens and market gardens, the lots of ground adjoining the corridor, and the proprietors of these lots on both sides thought they had a party wall before their eyes, and did not even suspect the long, paved ribbon winding between two walls amid their flower-beds and their orchards.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I—THE HOUSE WITH A SECRET
18  , with its great roof oddly pierced with dormer windows, dilapidated palisades, a little water amid poplar-trees, women, voices, laughter; on the horizon the Pantheon, the pole of the Deaf-Mutes, the Val-de-Grace, black, squat, fantastic, amusing, magnificent, and in the background, the severe square crests of the towers of Notre Dame.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I—THE LARK'S MEADOW
19  About the middle of the last century, a chief justice in the Parliament of Paris having a mistress and concealing the fact, for at that period the grand seignors displayed their mistresses, and the bourgeois concealed them, had "a little house" built in the Faubourg Saint-Germain, in the deserted Rue Blomet, which is now called Rue Plumet, not far from the spot which was then designated as Combat des Animaux.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I—THE HOUSE WITH A SECRET
20  In a ditch on the boulevard, between Pere-Lachaise and the Barriere du Trone, at the most deserted spot, some children, while playing, discovered beneath a mass of shavings and refuse bits of wood, a bag containing a bullet-mould, a wooden punch for the preparation of cartridges, a wooden bowl, in which there were grains of hunting-powder, and a little cast-iron pot whose interior presented evident traces of melted lead.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V—FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY ...