SLEEP in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables (V4) by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - sleep in Les Misérables (V4)
1  Still the little one could not sleep.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM ...
2  When a body goes to bed, he must sleep.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM ...
3  Then, by way of dinner, he tried to sleep.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER II—MOTHER PLUTARQUE FINDS NO DIFFICULTY IN ...
4  "Go and sleep somewhere else," cried Enjolras.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 12: CHAPTER III—NIGHT BEGINS TO DESCEND UPON GRANTAIRE
5  "We don't know where we are to sleep," replied the elder.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM ...
6  He was some corner errand-man who had drunk too much and was sleeping too much.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 15: CHAPTER IV—GAVROCHE'S EXCESS OF ZEAL
7  Old Toussaint, who retired early, thought of nothing but her sleep, and was as ignorant of the whole matter as Jean Valjean.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER III—THE BEGINNING OF SHADOW
8  He advanced nearly to the front rank of the column, with the movement of a man who is marching and the countenance of a man who is sleeping.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 11: CHAPTER V—THE OLD MAN
9  This was a great deal for those cowardly streets, which desire to go to sleep at sunset, and which put the extinguisher on their candles at such an early hour.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 15: CHAPTER IV—GAVROCHE'S EXCESS OF ZEAL
10  The light does not bear away terrestrial perfumes into the azure depths, without knowing what it is doing; the night distributes stellar essences to the sleeping flowers.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III—FOLIIS AC FRONDIBUS
11  You will drink water, you will eat black bread, you will sleep on a plank with a fetter whose cold touch you will feel on your flesh all night long, riveted to your limbs.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER II—MOTHER PLUTARQUE FINDS NO DIFFICULTY IN ...
12  The Restoration had been one of those intermediate phases, hard to define, in which there is fatigue, buzzing, murmurs, sleep, tumult, and which are nothing else than the arrival of a great nation at a halting-place.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
13  His feline eye had just descried, in the recess of a carriage door, what is called in painting, an ensemble, that is to say, a person and a thing; the thing was a hand-cart, the person was a man from Auvergene who was sleeping therein.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 15: CHAPTER IV—GAVROCHE'S EXCESS OF ZEAL
14  It lulls to sleep the fevers of the mind at labor, which are sometimes severe, and produces in the spirit a soft and fresh vapor which corrects the over-harsh contours of pure thought, fills in gaps here and there, binds together and rounds off the angles of the ideas.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I—THE LARK'S MEADOW
15  Before any sound had reached the watcher, who was sleeping in the grated cell which opened into the dormitory, the wall had, been pierced, the chimney scaled, the iron grating which barred the upper orifice of the flue forced, and the two redoubtable ruffians were on the roof.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER III—THE VICISSITUDES OF FLIGHT
16  Nothing was to be seen, however, but at the bottom of that dense obscurity there could be distinguished a multitude of metallic threads, as fine as needles and almost imperceptible, which moved about like those indescribable phosphoric networks which one sees beneath one's closed eyelids, in the first mists of slumber at the moment when one is dropping off to sleep.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 14: CHAPTER I—THE FLAG: ACT FIRST
17  A wintry gale, which mingled with the rain, blew in gusts, the patrol searched all the doorways, alleys, enclosures, and obscure nooks, and in their search for nocturnal vagabonds they passed in silence before the elephant; the monster, erect, motionless, staring open-eyed into the shadows, had the appearance of dreaming happily over his good deed; and sheltered from heaven and from men the three poor sleeping children.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—IN WHICH LITTLE GAVROCHE EXTRACTS PROFIT FROM ...