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Quotes of TRAVEL from Hard Times by Charles Dickens

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Gradgrind walked direct from his own house into the country, to be taken up on the line by which he was to travel; and at night the remaining two set forth upon their different course, encouraged by not seeing any face they knew.
Charles Dickens
Hard Times, BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI   Context
She was very cleanly and plainly dressed, had country mud upon her shoes, and was newly come from a journey.
Charles Dickens
Hard Times, BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII   Context
When it was first proposed that I should go abroad, or how it came to be agreed among us that I was to seek the restoration of my peace in change and travel, I do not, even now, distinctly know.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 54. Mr. MICAWBER'S TRANSACTIONS   Context
I see our children and our friends around us; and I hear the roar of many voices, not indifferent to me as I travel on.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 64. A LAST RETROSPECT   Context
Micawber, that, when he went from London to Canterbury, he should have talked as if he were going to the farthest limits of the earth; and, when he went from England to Australia, as if he were going for a little trip across the channel.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 57. THE EMIGRANTS   Context
But as we drew nearer to the end of our journey, he had more to do and less time for gallantry; and when we got on Yarmouth pavement, we were all too much shaken and jolted, I apprehend, to have any leisure for anything else.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR   Context
But under this difficulty, as under all the other difficulties of my journey, I seemed to be sustained and led on by my fanciful picture of my mother in her youth, before I came into the world.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION   Context
I was robbed at first setting out, and have walked all the way, and have never slept in a bed since I began the journey.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION   Context
Her utmost powers of expression (which were certainly not great in ink) were exhausted in the attempt to write what she felt on the subject of my journey.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP   Context
I spoke from the pit of my stomach for the rest of the journey, but I felt completely extinguished, and dreadfully young.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 19. I LOOK ABOUT ME, AND MAKE A DISCOVERY   Context
It was curious and interesting, nevertheless, to be sitting up there behind four horses: well educated, well dressed, and with plenty of money in my pocket; and to look out for the places where I had slept on my weary journey.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 19. I LOOK ABOUT ME, AND MAKE A DISCOVERY   Context
As it contained matter on which I thought Steerforth could advise me as well as anyone, and on which I knew I should be delighted to consult him, I resolved to make it a subject of discussion on our journey home.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 23. I CORROBORATE Mr. DICK, AND CHOOSE A PROFESSI   Context
He was mighty learned about the case, to me; but the upshot of his opinion was, that the carrier was making his last journey rather fast.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET   Context
Everything seemed, to my imagination, to be hushed in reverence for him, as he resumed his solitary journey through the snow.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 40. THE WANDERER   Context
We sat him between us, not knowing how to give him welcome enough; and as I began to listen to his old familiar voice, I could have fancied he was still pursuing his long journey in search of his darling niece.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 63. A VISITOR   Context
She would rather I did not travel alone, and objects to receiving my maid, for she has a sensitive horror of being talked of by such people.
Charles Dickens
Great Expectations, Chapter XXXVIII   Context
They awakened a tender emotion in me; for my heart was softened by my return, and such a change had come to pass, that I felt like one who was toiling home barefoot from distant travel, and whose wanderings had lasted many years.
Charles Dickens
Great Expectations, Chapter LVIII   Context
But, he was particular in stipulating that if I were not received with cordiality, or if I were not encouraged to repeat my visit as a visit which had no ulterior object but was simply one of gratitude for a favor received, then this experimental trip should have no successor.
Charles Dickens
Great Expectations, Chapter XV   Context
It was dark before we got down, and the journey seemed long and dreary to me, who could see little of it inside, and who could not go outside in my disabled state.
Charles Dickens
Great Expectations, Chapter LII   Context
Herbert got a large bottle of stuff for my arm; and by dint of having this stuff dropped over it all the night through, I was just able to bear its pain on the journey.
Charles Dickens
Great Expectations, Chapter LIII   Context
Bumble, moving his chair by little and little, soon began to diminish the distance between himself and the matron; and, continuing to travel round the outer edge of the circle, brought his chair, in time, close to that in which the matron was seated.
Charles Dickens
Oliver Twist, CHAPTER XXIII   Context
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