SAT Vocabulary Groups
 SAT Vocabulary in Sentences
I'm hovering in a makeshift kitchen, watching one of Italy's most eminent marine biologists gleefully playing chef.
a. makeshift
serving as a temporary substitute; sufficient for the time being
It's important to have a multilayered, deep defensive posture and not to rely on a single perimeter approach to mitigate risk.
v. mitigate
make less severe, serious, or painful.
It was agreed without further argument that the milk and the windfall apples should be reserved for the pigs alone.
n. windfall
an apple or other fruit blown down from a tree or bush by the wind.
We prefer to be seen with each other, instead of looking at each other: the back of selfie is vanity.
n. selfie
a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.
Davi was born without fully developed limbs but he's not been discouraged, despite the haphazard nature of facilities in Brazil; "Sport is my life because without sport I'm not Davi, " he said, brimming with confidence.
n. haphazard
lacking any obvious principle of organization.
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SAT Vocabulary with Sentence

Like all English language tests, SAT will check the vocabulary capability of test takers. No matter what questions on test papers, both reading and writing rely on actual vocabulary skill to get high score. A strong SAT vocabulary may not ensure a good score; however the reverse is true: a weak vocabulary will lead a bad SAT result. So building SAT vocabulary is the most important job when you prepare this test.

Students have various ways to build own SAT vocabulary.One method is to learn new words from samples and contexts. When you study or review words, especially difficult words, good examples help very much. These sentences not only let you understand new words precisely, but also push you to use new words confidently. As long as you bind them with sentences, they can improve your performance in all SAT test sections, especially in writing test.

Here we list 200 difficult SAT words and their example sentences. Many of the sentences are selected from media or Internet. The real and alive English sentences give you actual context samples, which help to memorize hard SAT words by context and trigger inspiration to use them in SAT writing test.

A list of 200 words is a relatively small SAT vocabulary. It's far away from actual SAT vocabulary demand. None can take such a short list as only asset to pass SAT test. However, considering it's a short and difficult word list, it can be used to evaluate SAT vocabulary skill quickly. Some SAT test takers also use it as a supplement material in short training.

The key point of this small SAT vocabulary is its sentences, which are excellent examples of how to use these words. Leveraging the sentences, students can take this small SAT vocabulary as a very useful resource to enhance words for writing test. This is the reason we revise the example sentences from time to time. Learn hard word with sentence may costs more time, but your reading and writing are both enhanced, it's sort of to kill two birds with one stone.


[6 Words Quick View]

calumny: Read
/'kæləmnɪ/ n. Syn. slander
false statement maliciously made to injure another's reputation; slander
He could endure his financial failure, but he could not bear the calumny that his foes heaped upon him.

clemency: Read
/'klɛmənsɪ/ n.
mildness, as of the weather; merciful, kind, or lenient act
The lawyer was pleased when the case was sent to Judge Smith's chambers because Smith was noted for her clemency toward first offenders.

concomitant: Read
/kən'kɒmɪtənt/ a. Syn. accompanying
in conjunction with; accompanying; associated with
These two-sided attributes are known as concomitant characteristics.

conundrum: Read
/kə'nʌndrəm/ n. Syn. riddle
riddle; difficult problem; dilemma
For this reason, the best way out of this conundrum is a political compromise.

cupidity: Read
/kju:'pɪdɪtɪ/ n. Syn. greed
greed; excessive desire, especially for wealth
The defeated people could not satisfy the cupidity of the conquerors, who demanded excessive tribute.

decry: Read
/dɪ'kraɪ/ v. Syn. disparage
express strong disapproval of; disparage
The founder of the Children's Defense Fund, Marian Wright Edelman, would strongly decry the lack of financial and moral support for children in America today.

......

antipathy  Read
Exercise
strong feeling of aversion; dislike
Exercise
make shiny by rubbing; polish
Exercise
still in existence; not destroyed, lost, or extinct
Exercise
express disapproval of; protest against; belittle
boon  Read
Exercise
blessing; benefit bestowed, especially in response to a request
Exercise
very bad; extremely inferiorl; intolerable; very hateful
Exercise
greed; excessive desire, especially for wealth
Exercise
large destructive fire; burning; large-scale military conflict
cajole  Read
Exercise
influence or urge by gentle urging or flattering
Exercise
strong feeling of aversion; dislike
Exercise
ridicule; make fun of; laugh at with contempt
Exercise
solemn curse; someone or something regarded as a curse
defile  Read
Exercise
without feeling; revealing little emotion or sensibility; not easily aroused or excited
Exercise
pollute; make dirty or spotty
Exercise
disguise or conceal behind a false appearance; make a false show of
Exercise
solemn curse; someone or something regarded as a curse
demure  Read
Exercise
modest and reserved in manner or behavior
Exercise
make amends or pay the penalty for; relieve or cleanse of guilt
Exercise
violate with violence, especially to sacred place
Exercise
large destructive fire; burning; large-scale military conflict
deride  Read
Exercise
ridicule; make fun of; laugh at with contempt
Exercise
in conjunction with; accompanying; associated with
Exercise
cancel; remove; erase or strike out
Exercise
make amends or pay the penalty for; relieve or cleanse of guilt
evanescent  Read
Exercise
improperly forward or bold; rude
Exercise
fleeting; vanishing or likely to vanish like vapor
Exercise
pollute; make dirty or spotty
Exercise
shameless or brazen boldness; insolent and shameless audacity
fallacious  Read
Exercise
shameless or brazen boldness; insolent and shameless audacity
Exercise
abolish, do away with, or annul, especially by authority
Exercise
marked by sudden and violent force; hasty; impulsive and passionate
Exercise
false; tending to mislead; deceptive
fetid  Read
Exercise
notorious; conspicuously bad or shocking
Exercise
express disapproval of; protest against; belittle
Exercise
unpleasant-smelling; having offensive smell; stinking
Exercise
pollute; make dirty or spotty
harangue  Read
Exercise
tireless; showing sustained enthusiastic action
Exercise
noisy speech; speech or piece of writing with strong feeling or expression
Exercise
notorious; conspicuously bad or shocking
Exercise
not capable of being swayed; unyielding; implacable
Read [Esc]
/'ædʌmbreɪt/ v. Syn. overshadow; shade
give hint or indication of something; disclose partially or guardedly; overshadow; shade
Her constant complaining about the job would [___] her intent to leave.


Spelling Word: adumbrate
Read [Esc]
/ə'sɛtɪk/ a. Syn. austere; severe
leading a life of self-discipline and self-denial; austere
The wealthy, self-indulgent young man felt oddly drawn to the strict, [___] life led by members of some monastic orders.


Spelling Word: ascetic
Read [Esc]
/brʊsk/;/brʌsk/ a. Syn. blunt; abrupt
abrupt and curt in manner or speech; rudely abrupt, unfriendly
Was Bruce too [___] when he brushed off Bob's request with a curt "Not now!"?


Spelling Word: brusque
Read [Esc]
/dɪ'kraɪ/ v. Syn. disparage
express strong disapproval of; disparage
The founder of the Children's Defense Fund, Marian Wright Edelman, would strongly [___] the lack of financial and moral support for children in America today.


Spelling Word: decry
Read [Esc]
/dɪ'skɜrsɪv/ a.
tending to depart from main point or cover a wide range of subjects
As the lecturer wandered from topic to topic, we wondered what if any point there was to his [___] remarks.


Spelling Word: discursive
Read [Esc]
/fæ'stɪdɪəs/ a.
difficult to please; having complicated requirements; excessively particular demanding about details
Bobby was such a [___] eater that he would eat a sandwich only if his mother first cut off every scrap of crust.


Spelling Word: fastidious
Read [Esc]
/'fætjʊəs/ a. Syn. foolish
foolish or silly, especially in self-satisfied way
He is far too intelligent to utter such [___] remarks.


Spelling Word: fatuous
Read [Esc]
/grɪ'gɛərɪəs/ a. Syn. sociable
sociable; seeking and enjoying the company of others
Natural selection in [___] animals operates upon groups rather than upon individuals.


Spelling Word: gregarious
Read [Esc]
/hə'ræŋ/ n.
noisy speech; speech or piece of writing with strong feeling or expression
In her lengthy [___], the principal berated the offenders.


Spelling Word: harangue
Read [Esc]
/hɪ'gɛmənɪ/;/'hɛdʒɛmoʊnɪ/ n.
domination, influence, or authority over another, especially by political group or nation over others
When Germany claimed [___] over Russia, Stalin was outraged.


Spelling Word: hegemony