Les Misérables (V3)

By Victor Hugo
Study, understand, and note classic literature online.

Helps students work on Les Misérables (V3), BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—PARVULUS; it's not only for generic leisure reading, but designed to accumulate new words and phrases, as well as study language and culture. You can note new words or any items by chapters, print notes after your finishing the task. The app integrates with modern IT, like sync to cloud, share notes among various devices, lookup online, and etc.
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User Tips:
  1. In most cases, the notes are for unknown words and phrases, but you can add any types of items. "Word" is a key to refer your notes.
  2. The notes are organized by chapters.It means you had better keep "Word" unique in same chapter.
  3. Add / Update notes is by note panel that can be opened through multiple ways.When adding a "Word", the "Word" field cannot be empty; when updating, if you clean the "Word" field, the current note will be removed.
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  5. By default, double click a word will bring up a note panel showing unless the word is too easy, which is masked intentionally, like "the", "see", etc.However, you can manually add any words or items.
  6. Online look up feature is powered by Wordnik, you can edit or modify its result on demand.
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  8. Last but not least, you can merge all notes of the book, view and print them.
 BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—PARVULUS          

Paris has a child, and the forest has a bird; the bird is called the sparrow; the child is called the gamin.

Couple these two ideas which contain, the one all the furnace, the other all the dawn; strike these two sparks together, Paris, childhood; there leaps out from them a little being. Homuncio, Plautus would say.

This little being is joyous. He has not food every day, and he goes to the play every evening, if he sees good. He has no shirt on his body, no shoes on his feet, no roof over his head; he is like the flies of heaven, who have none of these things. He is from seven to thirteen years of age, he lives in bands, roams the streets, lodges in the open air, wears an old pair of trousers of his father's, which descend below his heels, an old hat of some other father, which descends below his ears, a single suspender of yellow listing; he runs, lies in wait, rummages about, wastes time, blackens pipes, swears like a convict, haunts the wine-shop, knows thieves, calls gay women thou, talks slang, sings obscene songs, and has no evil in his heart. This is because he has in his heart a pearl, innocence; and pearls are not to be dissolved in mud. So long as man is in his childhood, God wills that he shall be innocent.

If one were to ask that enormous city: "What is this?" she would reply: "It is my little one."

 Notes of the Chapter