Songs of Experience

By William Blake
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Helps students work on Songs of Experience, INTRODUCTION; it's not only for generic leisure reading, but designed to accumulate new words and phrases, as well as study language and culture. You can note new words or any items by chapters, print notes after your finishing the task. The app integrates with modern IT, like sync to cloud, share notes among various devices, lookup online, and etc.
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User Tips:
  1. In most cases, the notes are for unknown words and phrases, but you can add any types of items. "Word" is a key to refer your notes.
  2. The notes are organized by chapters.It means you had better keep "Word" unique in same chapter.
  3. Add / Update notes is by note panel that can be opened through multiple ways.When adding a "Word", the "Word" field cannot be empty; when updating, if you clean the "Word" field, the current note will be removed.
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  5. By default, double click a word will bring up a note panel showing unless the word is too easy, which is masked intentionally, like "the", "see", etc.However, you can manually add any words or items.
  6. Online look up feature is powered by Wordnik, you can edit or modify its result on demand.
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  8. Last but not least, you can merge all notes of the book, view and print them.
 INTRODUCTION          

Hear the voice of the Bard,

Who present, past, and future, sees;

Whose ears have heard

The Holy Word

That walked among the ancient trees;

Calling the lapsed soul,

And weeping in the evening dew;

That might control

The starry pole,

And fallen, fallen light renew!

‘O Earth, O Earth, return!

Arise from out the dewy grass!

Night is worn,

And the morn

Rises from the slumbrous mass.

‘Turn away no more;

Why wilt thou turn away?

The starry floor,

The watery shore,

Is given thee till the break of day.’

 Notes of the Chapter