ENGLISH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - English in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  The man knew more than enough English for that.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
2  England is bad enough I know, and English society is all wrong.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
3  I believe he married Lady Radley's maid, and has established her in Paris as an English dressmaker.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
4  "I'll back English women against the world, Harry," said Lord Fermor, striking the table with his fist.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  The Queen used to ask me about the English noble who was always quarrelling with the cabmen about their fares.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
6  I quite sympathize with the rage of the English democracy against what they call the vices of the upper orders.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
7  Well, I can tell you anything that is in an English Blue Book, Harry, although those fellows nowadays write a lot of nonsense.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
8  "American girls are as clever at concealing their parents, as English women are at concealing their past," he said, rising to go.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
9  The inherited stupidity of the race--sound English common sense he jovially termed it--was shown to be the proper bulwark for society.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
10  His father had been our ambassador at Madrid when Isabella was young and Prim unthought of, but had retired from the diplomatic service in a capricious moment of annoyance on not being offered the Embassy at Paris, a post to which he considered that he was fully entitled by reason of his birth, his indolence, the good English of his dispatches, and his inordinate passion for pleasure.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3