EYES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - Eyes in The Aeneid
1  Old Entellus stands immoveable and astrain, only parrying hits with body and watchful eye.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
2  He remains, unterrified, awaiting his noble foe, steady in his own bulk, and measures with his eye the fair range for a spear.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK TENTH
3  For now Dido recks not of eye or tongue, nor sets her heart on love in secret: she calls it marriage, and with this name veils her fall.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
4  In such words he pleaded, clasping the altars; the Lord omnipotent heard, and cast his eye on the royal city and the lovers forgetful of their fairer fame.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
5  heightened by Turnus, as advancing with noiseless pace he humbly worships at the altar with downcast eye, by his wasted cheeks and the pallor on his youthful frame.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK TWELFTH
6  We descry the Aetnean brotherhood standing impotent with scowling eye, their stately heads up to heaven, a dreadful consistory; even as on a mountain summit stand oaks high in air or coned cypresses, a high forest of Jove or covert of Diana.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
7  Her, one saith, Mother Earth, when stung by wrath against the gods, bore last sister to Coeus and Enceladus, fleet-footed and swift of wing, ominous, awful, vast; for every feather on her body is a waking eye beneath, wonderful to tell, and a tongue, and as many loud lips and straining ears.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH