FITZWILLIAM in Classic Quotes

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 Current Search - Fitzwilliam in Pride and Prejudice
1  "He did not talk to me of his own arts," said Fitzwilliam, smiling.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
2  "He likes to have his own way very well," replied Colonel Fitzwilliam.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
3  I can answer your question," said Fitzwilliam, "without applying to him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
4  "Pray let me hear what you have to accuse him of," cried Colonel Fitzwilliam.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
5  After watching her a little, Fitzwilliam asked her why she was so thoughtful.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
6  No," said Colonel Fitzwilliam, "that is an advantage which he must divide with me.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
7  In her kind schemes for Elizabeth, she sometimes planned her marrying Colonel Fitzwilliam.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 32
8  Colonel Fitzwilliam, who led the way, was about thirty, not handsome, but in person and address most truly the gentleman.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
9  Colonel Fitzwilliam had called at the Parsonage more than once during the time, but Mr. Darcy they had seen only at church.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
10  When coffee was over, Colonel Fitzwilliam reminded Elizabeth of having promised to play to him; and she sat down directly to the instrument.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
11  Colonel Fitzwilliam's manners were very much admired at the Parsonage, and the ladies all felt that he must add considerably to the pleasures of their engagements at Rosings.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
12  Colonel Fitzwilliam seemed really glad to see them; anything was a welcome relief to him at Rosings; and Mrs. Collins's pretty friend had moreover caught his fancy very much.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
13  Elizabeth laughed heartily at this picture of herself, and said to Colonel Fitzwilliam, "Your cousin will give you a very pretty notion of me, and teach you not to believe a word I say."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
14  She was engaged one day as she walked, in perusing Jane's last letter, and dwelling on some passages which proved that Jane had not written in spirits, when, instead of being again surprised by Mr. Darcy, she saw on looking up that Colonel Fitzwilliam was meeting her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
15  Colonel Fitzwilliam entered into conversation directly with the readiness and ease of a well-bred man, and talked very pleasantly; but his cousin, after having addressed a slight observation on the house and garden to Mrs. Collins, sat for some time without speaking to anybody.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
16  On being made acquainted with the present Mr. Darcy's treatment of him, she tried to remember some of that gentleman's reputed disposition when quite a lad which might agree with it, and was confident at last that she recollected having heard Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy formerly spoken of as a very proud, ill-natured boy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
17  Colonel Fitzwilliam's occasionally laughing at his stupidity, proved that he was generally different, which her own knowledge of him could not have told her; and as she would liked to have believed this change the effect of love, and the object of that love her friend Eliza, she set herself seriously to work to find it out.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 32
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