GOD in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables (V5) by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - God in Les Misérables (V5)
1  God passes on to the following act.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER VII—THE EFFECTS OF DREAMS MINGLED WITH HAPPINESS
2  God was serving the universal repast.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XVI—HOW FROM A BROTHER ONE BECOMES A FATHER
3  The French revolution is an act of God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XX—THE DEAD ARE IN THE RIGHT AND THE LIVING ARE ...
4  Up to that time, he had not believed in God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER II—MARIUS, EMERGING FROM CIVIL WAR, MAKES READY ...
5  Love is the folly of men and the wit of God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER IV—MADEMOISELLE GILLENORMAND ENDS BY NO LONGER ...
6  Each man has his own fashion of adoring God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—JEAN VALJEAN STILL WEARS HIS ARM IN A SLING
7  Marius absent three days, this was horrible on the part of the good God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X—DAWN
8  Gisquet; up to that day he had never dreamed of that other superior, God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—JAVERT
9  This new chief, God, he became unexpectedly conscious of, and he felt embarrassed by him.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—JAVERT
10  The pupil dilates in the dark, and the soul dilates in misfortune and ends by finding God there.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I—THE SEWER AND ITS SURPRISES
11  From the moment when Marius took his place, and was the substitute, Cosette would not have regretted God himself.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—JEAN VALJEAN STILL WEARS HIS ARM IN A SLING
12  He reflected that this was but just, and he remained there for some time, with his soul absorbed in words addressed to God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI—THE FONTIS
13  Then, as is the nature of these clouds, calm returned to her, and hope and a sort of unconscious smile, which yet indicated trust in God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X—DAWN
14  An oriental tale relates how the rose was made white by God, but that Adam looked upon her when she was unfolding, and she was ashamed and turned crimson.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X—DAWN
15  "God is dead, perhaps," said Gerard de Nerval one day to the writer of these lines, confounding progress with God, and taking the interruption of movement for the death of Being.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XX—THE DEAD ARE IN THE RIGHT AND THE LIVING ARE ...
16  They thought they heard voices carolling in the infinite; they had God in their hearts; destiny appeared to them like a ceiling of stars; above their heads they beheld the light of a rising sun.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—JEAN VALJEAN STILL WEARS HIS ARM IN A SLING
17  The spirit of revolution covered with its cloud this summit where rumbled that voice of the people which resembles the voice of God; a strange majesty was emitted by this titanic basket of rubbish.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—THE CHARYBDIS OF THE FAUBOURG SAINT ANTOINE AND ...
18  That which was passing in Javert was the Fampoux of a rectilinear conscience, the derailment of a soul, the crushing of a probity which had been irresistibly launched in a straight line and was breaking against God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—JAVERT
19  The book which the reader has under his eye at this moment is, from one end to the other, as a whole and in detail, whatever may be its intermittences, exceptions and faults, the march from evil to good, from the unjust to the just, from night to day, from appetite to conscience, from rottenness to life, from hell to heaven, from nothingness to God.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XX—THE DEAD ARE IN THE RIGHT AND THE LIVING ARE ...
20  A whole new world was dawning on his soul: kindness accepted and repaid, devotion, mercy, indulgence, violences committed by pity on austerity, respect for persons, no more definitive condemnation, no more conviction, the possibility of a tear in the eye of the law, no one knows what justice according to God, running in inverse sense to justice according to men.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—JAVERT