GOLD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - Gold in Moby Dick
1  But that gold watch he sought was the innermost life of the fish.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. Stubb Kills a Whale.
2  And this, good friends, is ambergris, worth a gold guinea an ounce to any druggist.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 91. The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud.
3  The sea was as a crucible of molten gold, that bubblingly leaps with light and heat.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 124. The Needle.
4  I see nothing here, but a round thing made of gold, and whoever raises a certain whale, this round thing belongs to him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
5  Then the Captain knows that Jonah is a fugitive; but at the same time resolves to help a flight that paves its rear with gold.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
6  In this business he proceeds very heedfully, like a treasure-hunter in some old house, sounding the walls to find where the gold is masoned in.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 78. Cistern and Buckets.
7  And all from looking at a piece of gold, which did I have it now on Negro Hill or in Corlaer's Hook, I'd not look at it very long ere spending it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
8  The flashing cascade of his mane, the curving comet of his tail, invested him with housings more resplendent than gold and silver-beaters could have furnished him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. The Whiteness of The Whale.
9  "No fairy fingers can have pressed the gold, but devil's claws must have left their mouldings there since yesterday," murmured Starbuck to himself, leaning against the bulwarks.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
10  Now this doubloon was of purest, virgin gold, raked somewhere out of the heart of gorgeous hills, whence, east and west, over golden sands, the head-waters of many a Pactolus flows.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
11  Another runs to read the bill that's stuck against the spile upon the wharf to which the ship is moored, offering five hundred gold coins for the apprehension of a parricide, and containing a description of his person.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
12  I have seen doubloons before now in my voyagings; your doubloons of old Spain, your doubloons of Peru, your doubloons of Chili, your doubloons of Bolivia, your doubloons of Popayan; with plenty of gold moidores and pistoles, and joes, and half joes, and quarter joes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
13  When reaching far over the bow, Stubb slowly churned his long sharp lance into the fish, and kept it there, carefully churning and churning, as if cautiously seeking to feel after some gold watch that the whale might have swallowed, and which he was fearful of breaking ere he could hook it out.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. Stubb Kills a Whale.
14  Here palms, alpacas, and volcanoes; sun's disks and stars; ecliptics, horns-of-plenty, and rich banners waving, are in luxuriant profusion stamped; so that the precious gold seems almost to derive an added preciousness and enhancing glories, by passing through those fancy mints, so Spanishly poetic.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
15  The firm tower, that is Ahab; the volcano, that is Ahab; the courageous, the undaunted, and victorious fowl, that, too, is Ahab; all are Ahab; and this round gold is but the image of the rounder globe, which, like a magician's glass, to each and every man in turn but mirrors back his own mysterious self.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
16  While the mate was getting the hammer, Ahab, without speaking, was slowly rubbing the gold piece against the skirts of his jacket, as if to heighten its lustre, and without using any words was meanwhile lowly humming to himself, producing a sound so strangely muffled and inarticulate that it seemed the mechanical humming of the wheels of his vitality in him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.