HATH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - Hath in The Merchant of Venice
1  He hath a great infection, sir, as one would say, to serve.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
2  Yet his means are in supposition: he hath an argosy bound to Tripolis, another to the Indies.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
3  It doth appear you are a worthy judge; You know the law; your exposition Hath been most sound.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
4  My Lord Bassanio upon more advice, Hath sent you here this ring, and doth entreat Your company at dinner.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
5  For the intent and purpose of the law Hath full relation to the penalty, Which here appeareth due upon the bond.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
6  If I could add a lie unto a fault, I would deny it, but you see my finger Hath not the ring upon it, it is gone.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT V
7  I understand, moreover, upon the Rialto, he hath a third at Mexico, a fourth for England, and other ventures he hath squandered abroad.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
8  I tell thee, lady, this aspect of mine Hath fear'd the valiant; by my love I swear The best-regarded virgins of our clime Have lov'd it too.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
9  That he hath a neighbourly charity in him, for he borrowed a box of the ear of the Englishman, and swore he would pay him again when he was able.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
10  She hath directed How I shall take her from her father's house, What gold and jewels she is furnish'd with, What page's suit she hath in readiness.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
11  Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath fram'd strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes, And laugh like parrots at a bagpiper.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
12  Shylock thy master spoke with me this day, And hath preferr'd thee, if it be preferment To leave a rich Jew's service to become The follower of so poor a gentleman.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
13  Beshrew me but I love her heartily, For she is wise, if I can judge of her, And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true, And true she is, as she hath prov'd herself.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
14  Nor do I now make moan to be abridg'd From such a noble rate, but my chief care Is to come fairly off from the great debts Wherein my time, something too prodigal, Hath left me gag'd.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
15  You know I say nothing to him, for he understands not me, nor I him: he hath neither Latin, French, nor Italian, and you will come into the court and swear that I have a poor pennyworth in the English.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
16  Why, if two gods should play some heavenly match, And on the wager lay two earthly women, And Portia one, there must be something else Pawn'd with the other, for the poor rude world Hath not her fellow.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
17  Therefore the lott'ry that he hath devised in these three chests of gold, silver, and lead, whereof who chooses his meaning chooses you, will no doubt never be chosen by any rightly but one who you shall rightly love.
The Merchant of Venice By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
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