HELEN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - Helen in Jane Eyre
1  My eye sought Helen, and feared to find death.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
2  Still I felt that Helen Burns considered things by a light invisible to my eyes.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
3  Helen heard me patiently to the end: I expected she would then make a remark, but she said nothing.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
4  Helen sighed as her reverie fled, and getting up, obeyed the monitor without reply as without delay.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
5  I was silent; Helen had calmed me; but in the tranquillity she imparted there was an alloy of inexpressible sadness.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
6  Helen regarded me, probably with surprise: I could not now abate my agitation, though I tried hard; I continued to weep aloud.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
7  Now I wept: Helen Burns was not here; nothing sustained me; left to myself I abandoned myself, and my tears watered the boards.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
8  In her turn, Helen Burns asked me to explain, and I proceeded forthwith to pour out, in my own way, the tale of my sufferings and resentments.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
9  Miss Temple told Helen Burns to be seated in a low arm-chair on one side of the hearth, and herself taking another, she called me to her side.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
10  Helen Burns asked some slight question about her work of Miss Smith, was chidden for the triviality of the inquiry, returned to her place, and smiled at me as she again went by.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
11  Tea over and the tray removed, she again summoned us to the fire; we sat one on each side of her, and now a conversation followed between her and Helen, which it was indeed a privilege to be admitted to hear.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
12  Helen she held a little longer than me: she let her go more reluctantly; it was Helen her eye followed to the door; it was for her she a second time breathed a sad sigh; for her she wiped a tear from her cheek.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
13  Having invited Helen and me to approach the table, and placed before each of us a cup of tea with one delicious but thin morsel of toast, she got up, unlocked a drawer, and taking from it a parcel wrapped in paper, disclosed presently to our eyes a good-sized seed-cake.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
14  True, reader; and I knew and felt this: and though I am a defective being, with many faults and few redeeming points, yet I never tired of Helen Burns; nor ever ceased to cherish for her a sentiment of attachment, as strong, tender, and respectful as any that ever animated my heart.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
15  The moment Miss Scatcherd withdrew after afternoon school, I ran to Helen, tore it off, and thrust it into the fire: the fury of which she was incapable had been burning in my soul all day, and tears, hot and large, had continually been scalding my cheek; for the spectacle of her sad resignation gave me an intolerable pain at the heart.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
16  Miss Temple had always something of serenity in her air, of state in her mien, of refined propriety in her language, which precluded deviation into the ardent, the excited, the eager: something which chastened the pleasure of those who looked on her and listened to her, by a controlling sense of awe; and such was my feeling now: but as to Helen Burns, I was struck with wonder.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII