HERBERT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Herbert in Great Expectations
1  Herbert shrugged his shoulders.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
2  Herbert was my intimate companion and friend.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
3  Bad taste," said Herbert, laughing, "but a fact.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
4  Then the time comes," said Herbert, "when you see your opening.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
5  But the thing is," said Herbert Pocket, "that you look about you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
6  Herbert Pocket had a frank and easy way with him that was very taking.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
7  Not on any account," returned Herbert; "but a public-house may keep a gentleman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
8  At the hour and minute," said Herbert, nodding, "at which she afterwards stopped all the clocks.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
9  We had made some progress in the dinner, when I reminded Herbert of his promise to tell me about Miss Havisham.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
10  But again there came upon me, for my relief, that odd impression that Herbert Pocket would never be very successful or rich.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
11  "He may have been married already, and her cruel mortification may have been a part of her half-brother's scheme," said Herbert.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
12  I felt that this delicacy arose out of the consideration that the plan would save Herbert some expense, so I went off to Little Britain and imparted my wish to Mr. Jaggers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
13  For myself, I found that I was expressing my tendency to lavish expenditure, and to patronize Herbert, and to boast of my great prospects, before I quite knew that I had opened my lips.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
14  Between Mr. Pocket and Herbert I got on fast; and, with one or the other always at my elbow to give me the start I wanted, and clear obstructions out of my road, I must have been as great a dolt as Drummle if I had done less.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
15  Nor did the counting-house where Herbert assisted, show in my eyes as at all a good Observatory; being a back second floor up a yard, of a grimy presence in all particulars, and with a look into another back second floor, rather than a look out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
16  When these points were settled, and so far carried out as that I had begun to work in earnest, it occurred to me that if I could retain my bedroom in Barnard's Inn, my life would be agreeably varied, while my manners would be none the worse for Herbert's society.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
17  No one but themselves and Mrs. Coiler the toady neighbor showed any interest in this part of the conversation, and it appeared to me that it was painful to Herbert; but it promised to last a long time, when the page came in with the announcement of a domestic affliction.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
18  By degrees I learnt, and chiefly from Herbert, that Mr. Pocket had been educated at Harrow and at Cambridge, where he had distinguished himself; but that when he had had the happiness of marrying Mrs. Pocket very early in life, he had impaired his prospects and taken up the calling of a Grinder.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
19  When Herbert came, we went and had lunch at a celebrated house which I then quite venerated, but now believe to have been the most abject superstition in Europe, and where I could not help noticing, even then, that there was much more gravy on the tablecloths and knives and waiters' clothes, than in the steaks.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
20  I was at a loss to account for this surprising circumstance, and could not help giving my mind to speculations about it, until by and by Millers came down with the baby, which baby was handed to Flopson, which Flopson was handing it to Mrs. Pocket, when she too went fairly head foremost over Mrs. Pocket, baby and all, and was caught by Herbert and myself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII