JARVIS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Jarvis in A Tale of Two Cities
1  It is Jarvis Lorry who has replied to all the previous questions.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
2  The blue-flies buzzed again, and Mr. Attorney-General called Mr. Jarvis Lorry.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
3  These are again the words of Jarvis Lorry, as he clasps his hands, and looks upward.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
4  This being another question hard to answer, Mr. Jarvis Lorry withdrew to consider it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
5  She may ask for Mr. Jarvis Lorry, or she may only ask for a gentleman from Tellson's Bank.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
6  It is Jarvis Lorry who has alighted and stands with his hand on the coach door, replying to a group of officials.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIII. Fifty-two
7  Yielding to his own disturbance of mind, and to his young companion's agitation, which became greater every instant, Mr. Jarvis Lorry twice stopped to rest.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
8  Mr. Jarvis Lorry and Miss Manette, emerging from the wine-shop thus, joined Monsieur Defarge in the doorway to which he had directed his own company just before.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
9  These things were within Mr. Jarvis Lorry's knowledge, thoughts, and notice, when he rang the door-bell of the tranquil house in the corner, on the fine Sunday afternoon.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
10  Without directly answering to this appeal, she sat so still when he had very gently raised her, and the hands that had not ceased to clasp his wrists were so much more steady than they had been, that she communicated some reassurance to Mr. Jarvis Lorry.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
11  On the afternoon of a certain fine Sunday when the waves of four months had rolled over the trial for treason, and carried it, as to the public interest and memory, far out to sea, Mr. Jarvis Lorry walked along the sunny streets from Clerkenwell where he lived, on his way to dine with the Doctor.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI. Hundreds of People
12  And when Jarvis Lorry saw the kindled eyes, the resolute face, the calm strong look and bearing of the man whose life always seemed to him to have been stopped, like a clock, for so many years, and then set going again with an energy which had lain dormant during the cessation of its usefulness, he believed.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV. Calm in Storm