LADY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Lady in Hard Times
1  The name of that lady by the teapot, is Mrs. Sparsit.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
2  She had a great aunt living in these very times called Lady Scadgers.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
3  No one could wish to know it better than a lady of your eminence does.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
4  That lady acts as mistress of this house, and she is a highly connected lady.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  If what you have got to say can be said before a born lady, this lady will stay where she is.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
6  Mr. Bounderby looked very hard at the good lady in a side-long way that had an odd sheepishness about it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
7  Mr. Bounderby being a bachelor, an elderly lady presided over his establishment, in consideration of a certain annual stipend.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
8  But towards that lady, I do care what you do; and you shall do what is deferential and respectful, or you shall not come here.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
9  Accordingly, they went down to the drawing-room, where the esteemed lady with no nonsense about her, was recumbent as usual, while Sissy worked beside her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV
10  Stephen had not yet got the better of his having given the old lady pain, when his landlady came stumbling up the narrow stairs, and calling him to the door, whispered in his ear.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
11  The simple circumstance of being left alone with her husband and Mr. Bounderby, was sufficient to stun this admirable lady again without collision between herself and any other fact.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
12  And often and often of a night, he used to forget all his troubles in wondering whether the Sultan would let the lady go on with the story, or would have her head cut off before it was finished.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
13  That bereaved lady, fifteen years older than he, fell presently at deadly feud with her only relative, Lady Scadgers; and, partly to spite her ladyship, and partly to maintain herself, went out at a salary.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
14  That bereaved lady, fifteen years older than he, fell presently at deadly feud with her only relative, Lady Scadgers; and, partly to spite her ladyship, and partly to maintain herself, went out at a salary.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
15  Whether she would instantly depart, bag and baggage, to Lady Scadgers, or would positively refuse to budge from the premises; whether she would be plaintive or abusive, tearful or tearing; whether she would break her heart, or break the looking-glass; Mr. Bounderby could not all foresee.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XVI
16  These attributes of Coketown were in the main inseparable from the work by which it was sustained; against them were to be set off, comforts of life which found their way all over the world, and elegancies of life which made, we will not ask how much of the fine lady, who could scarcely bear to hear the place mentioned.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
17  As this was his usual hour for having a little confidential chat with Mrs. Sparsit, and as he had already caught her eye and seen that she was going to ask him something, he made a pretence of arranging the rulers, inkstands, and so forth, while that lady went on with her tea, glancing through the open window, down into the street.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
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