MAIDEN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
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 Current Search - Maiden in Little Women
1  The maiden lady is a Miss Norton, rich, cultivated, and kind.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE
2  I don't think I shall care to have much to do with any of them, except one sweetfaced maiden lady, who looks as if she had something in her.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE
3  A regular snow maiden, with blue eyes, and yellow hair curling on her shoulders, pale and slender, and always carrying herself like a young lady mindful of her manners.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER ONE
4  But Jo had her own eyes to take care of, and feeling that they could not be trusted, she prudently kept them on the little sock she was knitting, like a model maiden aunt.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER FORTY-THREE
5  "I'll try, but it was a very ungentlemanly thing to do, I didn't think you could be so sly and malicious, Laurie," replied Meg, trying to hide her maidenly confusion under a gravely reproachful air.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE
6  Out in the garden stood a stately snow maiden, crowned with holly, bearing a basket of fruit and flowers in one hand, a great roll of music in the other, a perfect rainbow of an Afghan round her chilly shoulders, and a Christmas carol issuing from her lips on a pink paper streamer.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO
7  She did pity the Davis girls, who were awkward, plain, and destitute of escort, except a grim papa and three grimmer maiden aunts, and she bowed to them in her friendliest manner as she passed, which was good of her, as it permitted them to see her dress, and burn with curiosity to know who her distinguished-looking friend might be.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott
Get Context   In CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN