NEWGATE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Newgate in Great Expectations
1  It brushes the Newgate cobwebs away, and pleases the Aged.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
2  Next thing to it," returned Wemmick, "I am going to Newgate.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
3  The cast was made in Newgate, directly after he was taken down.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
4  Turning into Cheapside and rattling up Newgate Street, we were soon under the walls of which I was so ashamed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIII
5  We were at Newgate in a few minutes, and we passed through the lodge where some fetters were hanging up on the bare walls among the prison rules, into the interior of the jail.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
6  My good Handel, is it not obvious that with Newgate in the next street, there must be far greater hazard in your breaking your mind to him and making him reckless, here, than elsewhere.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
7  I wished that Wemmick had not met me, or that I had not yielded to him and gone with him, so that, of all days in the year on this day, I might not have had Newgate in my breath and on my clothes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
8  So, I rubbed it off with all possible speed by turning into a street where I saw the great black dome of Saint Paul's bulging at me from behind a grim stone building which a bystander said was Newgate Prison.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
9  As I never assisted at any other representation of George Barnwell, I don't know how long it may usually take; but I know very well that it took until half-past nine o clock that night, and that when Mr. Wopsle got into Newgate, I thought he never would go to the scaffold, he became so much slower than at any former period of his disgraceful career.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV