NORLAND in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Norland in Sense and Sensibility
1  Mrs. John Dashwood said nothing; but her husband civilly hoped that she would not be settled far from Norland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
2  Mrs. John Dashwood now installed herself mistress of Norland; and her mother and sisters-in-law were degraded to the condition of visitors.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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3  Elinor had always thought it would be more prudent for them to settle at some distance from Norland, than immediately amongst their present acquaintance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
4  When your father and mother moved to Norland, though the furniture of Stanhill was sold, all the china, plate, and linen was saved, and is now left to your mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
5  HER wisdom too limited the number of their servants to three; two maids and a man, with whom they were speedily provided from amongst those who had formed their establishment at Norland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
6  Mr. John Dashwood told his mother again and again how exceedingly sorry he was that she had taken a house at such a distance from Norland as to prevent his being of any service to her in removing her furniture.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
7  In a very few weeks from the day which brought Sir John Middleton's first letter to Norland, every thing was so far settled in their future abode as to enable Mrs. Dashwood and her daughters to begin their journey.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
8  But Mrs. Dashwood began shortly to give over every hope of the kind, and to be convinced, from the general drift of his discourse, that his assistance extended no farther than their maintenance for six months at Norland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
9  Though her late conversation with her daughter-in-law had made her resolve on remaining at Norland no longer than was unavoidable, it had not produced the smallest effect on her in that point to which it principally tended.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
10  To him therefore the succession to the Norland estate was not so really important as to his sisters; for their fortune, independent of what might arise to them from their father's inheriting that property, could be but small.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
12  He really pressed them, with some earnestness, to consider Norland as their home; and, as no plan appeared so eligible to Mrs. Dashwood as remaining there till she could accommodate herself with a house in the neighbourhood, his invitation was accepted.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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13  Her eagerness to be gone from Norland was preserved from diminution by the evident satisfaction of her daughter-in-law in the prospect of her removal; a satisfaction which was but feebly attempted to be concealed under a cold invitation to her to defer her departure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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14  No difficulty arose on either side in the agreement; and she waited only for the disposal of her effects at Norland, and to determine her future household, before she set off for the west; and this, as she was exceedingly rapid in the performance of everything that interested her, was soon done.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
15  But her death, which happened ten years before his own, produced a great alteration in his home; for to supply her loss, he invited and received into his house the family of his nephew Mr. Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
16  This circumstance was a growing attachment between her eldest girl and the brother of Mrs. John Dashwood, a gentleman-like and pleasing young man, who was introduced to their acquaintance soon after his sister's establishment at Norland, and who had since spent the greatest part of his time there.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
17  To quit the neighbourhood of Norland was no longer an evil; it was an object of desire; it was a blessing, in comparison of the misery of continuing her daughter-in-law's guest; and to remove for ever from that beloved place would be less painful than to inhabit or visit it while such a woman was its mistress.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
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