PARIS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Paris in A Tale of Two Cities
1  I am going to Paris on business.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II. The Mail
2  I met him--by accident--a day and half's journey out of Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
3  Like Monsieur Manette, your father, the gentleman was of repute in Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
4  Worse quarters than Defarge's wine-shop, could easily have been found in Paris for a provincial slave of that degree.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
5  Monseigneur, one of the great lords in power at the Court, held his fortnightly reception in his grand hotel in Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
6  We have oftentimes the honour to entertain your gentlemen in their travelling backwards and forwards betwixt London and Paris, sir.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
7  The wine was red wine, and had stained the ground of the narrow street in the suburb of Saint Antoine, in Paris, where it was spilled.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
8  The fellow was brought, cap in hand, and the other fellows closed round to look and listen, in the manner of the people at the Paris fountain.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
9  The Defarges, husband and wife, came lumbering under the starlight, in their public vehicle, to that gate of Paris whereunto their journey naturally tended.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
10  It would have been difficult by a far brighter light, to recognise in Doctor Manette, intellectual of face and upright of bearing, the shoemaker of the garret in Paris.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV. Congratulatory
11  Such a staircase, with its accessories, in the older and more crowded parts of Paris, would be bad enough now; but, at that time, it was vile indeed to unaccustomed and unhardened senses.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
12  At the gallows and the wheel--the axe was a rarity--Monsieur Paris, as it was the episcopal mode among his brother Professors of the provinces, Monsieur Orleans, and the rest, to call him, presided in this dainty dress.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
13  They returned home to breakfast, and all went well, and in due course the golden hair that had mingled with the poor shoemaker's white locks in the Paris garret, were mingled with them again in the morning sunlight, on the threshold of the door at parting.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
14  They whisper at the fountain, that although condemned to death he will not be executed; they say that petitions have been presented in Paris, showing that he was enraged and made mad by the death of his child; they say that a petition has been presented to the King himself.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
15  It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I. The Period
16  Such homes had these various notabilities left behind them in the fine world of Paris, that the spies among the assembled devotees of Monseigneur--forming a goodly half of the polite company--would have found it hard to discover among the angels of that sphere one solitary wife, who, in her manners and appearance, owned to being a Mother.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII. Monseigneur in Town
17  Seven prisoners released, seven gory heads on pikes, the keys of the accursed fortress of the eight strong towers, some discovered letters and other memorials of prisoners of old time, long dead of broken hearts,--such, and such--like, the loudly echoing footsteps of Saint Antoine escort through the Paris streets in mid-July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXI. Echoing Footsteps
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