QUEEQUEG in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - Queequeg in Moby Dick
1  Now, Queequeg is my fellow man.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
2  Queequeg was George Washington cannibalistically developed.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
3  Thinks I, Queequeg, this is using Rogers's best cutlery with a vengeance.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
4  Nevertheless, a man like Queequeg you don't see every day, he and his ways were well worth unusual regarding.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
5  I had noticed also that Queequeg never consorted at all, or but very little, with the other seamen in the inn.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
6  Upon waking next morning about daylight, I found Queequeg's arm thrown over me in the most loving and affectionate manner.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
7  Returning to the Spouter-Inn from the Chapel, I found Queequeg there quite alone; he having left the Chapel before the benediction some time.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
8  Shaking off the sleet from my ice-glazed hat and jacket, I seated myself near the door, and turning sideways was surprised to see Queequeg near me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. The Chapel.
9  We will not speak of all Queequeg's peculiarities here; how he eschewed coffee and hot rolls, and applied his undivided attention to beefsteaks, done rare.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. Breakfast.
10  At that time in the morning any Christian would have washed his face; but Queequeg, to my amazement, contented himself with restricting his ablutions to his chest, arms, and hands.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
11  But if, like Queequeg and me in the bed, the tip of your nose or the crown of your head be slightly chilled, why then, indeed, in the general consciousness you feel most delightfully and unmistakably warm.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. Nightgown.
12  Thinks I, Queequeg, under the circumstances, this is a very civilized overture; but, the truth is, these savages have an innate sense of delicacy, say what you will; it is marvellous how essentially polite they are.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
13  Now, take away the awful fear, and my sensations at feeling the supernatural hand in mine were very similar, in their strangeness, to those which I experienced on waking up and seeing Queequeg's pagan arm thrown round me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
14  Indeed, partly lying on it as the arm did when I first awoke, I could hardly tell it from the quilt, they so blended their hues together; and it was only by the sense of weight and pressure that I could tell that Queequeg was hugging me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
15  If I had been astonished at first catching a glimpse of so outlandish an individual as Queequeg circulating among the polite society of a civilized town, that astonishment soon departed upon taking my first daylight stroll through the streets of New Bedford.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6. The Street.
16  So I kindled the shavings; helped prop up the innocent little idol; offered him burnt biscuit with Queequeg; salamed before him twice or thrice; kissed his nose; and that done, we undressed and went to bed, at peace with our own consciences and all the world.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
17  I pay this particular compliment to Queequeg, because he treated me with so much civility and consideration, while I was guilty of great rudeness; staring at him from the bed, and watching all his toilette motions; for the time my curiosity getting the better of my breeding.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
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