RACE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
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 Current Search - Race in The Last of the Mohicans
1  Horses of this race were, and are still, in much.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
2  I know that the pale faces are a proud and hungry race.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
3  She is of a race of traders, and will bargain for a bright look.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
4  Four warriors of his race have lived and died," he said, "since the friend of Tamenund led his people in battle.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
5  I was then a younker, and went out with the Delawares, because I know'd they were a scandalized and wronged race.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
6  Erect, his stature surpassed that of his fellows; though seated, he appeared reduced within the ordinary limits of the race.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
7  The Great Spirit has said, that the family of Wiss-entush should end; he is happy who knows that the evil of his race dies with himself.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
8  Look you, Delaware," she said, snapping her fingers in his face; "your nation is a race of women, and the hoe is better fitted to your hands than the gun.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
9  He met everywhere, with eyes riveted on his own, heads erect and nostrils expanded, as if each individual present felt himself able and willing, singly, to redress the wrongs of his race.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
10  He painted the quality as forming the great point of difference between the beaver and other brutes; between the brutes and men; and, finally, between the Hurons, in particular, and the rest of the human race.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
11  Long practised in all the subtle arts of his race, he drew, with great dexterity and quickness, the fantastic shadow that the natives were accustomed to consider as the evidence of a friendly and jocular disposition.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
12  They were all aged, even beyond that period to which the oldest present had reached; but one in the center, who leaned on his companions for support, had numbered an amount of years to which the human race is seldom permitted to attain.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
13  Ay, lad, there is truth in what you say; and I doubt not, on a rush, you would pass the whole nation; and, in a straight race of two miles, would be in, and get your breath again, afore a knave of them all was within hearing of the other village.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
14  The former was too much engrossed with his precious and nearly insensible burden, to be aware of their intentions before they were executed; and the latter, who considered even the hostile tribes of the Delawares a superior race of beings, submitted without resistance.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
15  "You showed knowledge in the shaping of a birchen bark, Uncas, when you chose this from among the Huron canoes," said the scout, smiling, apparently more in satisfaction at their superiority in the race than from that prospect of final escape which now began to open a little upon them.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
16  Though not admonished of your intentions in words," returned David, whose face was a little flushed, and whose ordinarily quiet and unmeaning eyes glimmered with an expression of unusual fire, "your men have reminded me of the children of Jacob going out to battle against the Shechemites, for wickedly aspiring to wedlock with a woman of a race that was favored of the Lord.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
17  He watched his slightest movement, however, with eager eyes; and, as he traced the fine outline of his admirably proportioned and active frame, he endeavored to persuade himself, that, if the powers of man, seconded by such noble resolution, could bear one harmless through so severe a trial, the youthful captive before him might hope for success in the hazardous race he was about to run.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
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