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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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1  You said just now that Estella was not related to Miss Havisham, but adopted.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
2  He holds the same relation towards numbers of people, and it might easily arise.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
3  It never did run out, however, but was brought to a premature end, as I proceed to relate.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
4  Mr. Pocket and I had for some time parted company as to our original relations, though we continued on the best terms.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
5  I thus became aware of the mutual relations between them and Mr. Pocket, which were exemplified in the following manner.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
6  To whom my sister, more for the relief of her own mind than for the gratification of his, related my pretended experiences.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
7  Her relations were poor and scheming, with the exception of my father; he was poor enough, but not time-serving or jealous.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
8  They had no doubt that Miss Havisham would "do something" for me; their doubts related to the form that something would take.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
9  This was not a very ceremonious way of rendering homage to a patron saint, but I believe Old Clem stood in that relation towards smiths.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
10  The nature of my relations with her, which placed me on terms of familiarity without placing me on terms of favor, conduced to my distraction.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
11  Biddy was Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt's granddaughter; I confess myself quiet unequal to the working out of the problem, what relation she was to Mr. Wopsle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
12  I was not related to the outlaw, or connected with him by any recognizable tie; he had put his hand to no writing or settlement in my favor before his apprehension, and to do so now would be idle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
13  Mr. Wopsle struck in upon that; as one who knew all about relationships, having professional occasion to bear in mind what female relations a man might not marry; and expounded the ties between me and Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
14  I wondered whether the two swollen faces were of Mr. Jaggers's family, and, if he were so unfortunate as to have had a pair of such ill-looking relations, why he stuck them on that dusty perch for the blacks and flies to settle on, instead of giving them a place at home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
15  Miss Havisham's intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
16  With my head full of George Barnwell, I was at first disposed to believe that I must have had some hand in the attack upon my sister, or at all events that as her near relation, popularly known to be under obligations to her, I was a more legitimate object of suspicion than any one else.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
17  My construction even of their simple meaning was not very correct, for I read "wife of the Above" as a complimentary reference to my father's exaltation to a better world; and if any one of my deceased relations had been referred to as "Below," I have no doubt I should have formed the worst opinions of that member of the family.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
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