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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - Row in Moby Dick
1  Midwifery should be taught in the same course with fencing and boxing, riding and rowing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 78. Cistern and Buckets.
2  A hundred black faces turned round in their rows to peer; and beyond, a black Angel of Doom was beating a book in a pulpit.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
3  Go to the meat-market of a Saturday night and see the crowds of live bipeds staring up at the long rows of dead quadrupeds.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 65. The Whale as a Dish.
4  In thoughts of the visions of the night, I saw long rows of angels in paradise, each with his hands in a jar of spermaceti.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 94. A Squeeze of the Hand.
5  Here, our old sailors say, in their black seventy-fours great admirals sometimes sit at table, and lord it over rows of captains and lieutenants.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 129. The Cabin.
6  The long rows of teeth on the bulwarks glistened in the moonlight; and like the white ivory tusks of some huge elephant, vast curving icicles depended from the bows.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. Merry Christmas.
7  Stubb's exordium to his crew is given here at large, because he had rather a peculiar way of talking to them in general, and especially in inculcating the religion of rowing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
8  But as he did so, the oarsmen expectantly desisted from rowing; the boat drifted a little towards the ship's stern; so that, as if by magic, the letter suddenly ranged along with Gabriel's eager hand.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 71. The Jeroboam's Story.
9  The headsman should stay in the bows from first to last; he should both dart the harpoon and the lance, and no rowing whatever should be expected of him, except under circumstances obvious to any fisherman.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 62. The Dart.
10  He kept a whole row of pipes there ready loaded, stuck in a rack, within easy reach of his hand; and, whenever he turned in, he smoked them all out in succession, lighting one from the other to the end of the chapter; then loading them again to be in readiness anew.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27. Knights and Squires.
11  In a pirate, man-of-war, or slave ship, when the captain is rowed anywhere in his boat, he always sits in the stern sheets on a comfortable, sometimes cushioned seat there, and often steers himself with a pretty little milliner's tiller decorated with gay cords and ribbons.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 53. The Gam.
12  And every morning, perched on our stays, rows of these birds were seen; and spite of our hootings, for a long time obstinately clung to the hemp, as though they deemed our ship some drifting, uninhabited craft; a thing appointed to desolation, and therefore fit roosting-place for their homeless selves.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
13  Hardly had they pulled out from under the ship's lee, when a fourth keel, coming from the windward side, pulled round under the stern, and showed the five strangers rowing Ahab, who, standing erect in the stern, loudly hailed Starbuck, Stubb, and Flask, to spread themselves widely, so as to cover a large expanse of water.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
14  But suddenly as he peered down and down into its depths, he profoundly saw a white living spot no bigger than a white weasel, with wonderful celerity uprising, and magnifying as it rose, till it turned, and then there were plainly revealed two long crooked rows of white, glistening teeth, floating up from the undiscoverable bottom.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 133. The Chase—First Day.