SILVER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - Silver in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  Noiselessly, and with silver feet, the shadows crept in from the garden.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  Yes," he continued, "I am less to you than your ivory Hermes or your silver Faun.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  The sky was pure opal now, and the roofs of the houses glistened like silver against it.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
4  Its supports were of silver gilt, beautifully chased, and profusely set with enamelled and jewelled medallions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
5  Then he loathed his own beauty, and flinging the mirror on the floor, crushed it into silver splinters beneath his heel.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
6  You had leaned over the still pool of some Greek woodland and seen in the water's silent silver the marvel of your own face.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
7  A faint blush, like the shadow of a rose in a mirror of silver, came to her cheeks as she glanced at the crowded enthusiastic house.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  It is of the great facts of the world, like sunlight, or spring-time, or the reflection in dark waters of that silver shell we call the moon.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
9  It was a rather curious one of Moorish workmanship, made of dull silver inlaid with arabesques of burnished steel, and studded with coarse turquoises.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
10  The lamps were lit, and an open Dutch silver spirit-case stood, with some siphons of soda-water and large cut-glass tumblers, on a little marqueterie table.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
11  And Lord Henry struck a light on a dainty silver case and began to smoke a cigarette with a self-conscious and satisfied air, as if he had summed up the world in a phrase.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
12  It was tea-time, and the mellow light of the huge, lace-covered lamp that stood on the table lit up the delicate china and hammered silver of the service at which the duchess was presiding.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
13  Another cope was of green velvet, embroidered with heart-shaped groups of acanthus-leaves, from which spread long-stemmed white blossoms, the details of which were picked out with silver thread and coloured crystals.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
14  He went towards the little, pearl-coloured octagonal stand that had always looked to him like the work of some strange Egyptian bees that wrought in silver, and taking up the volume, flung himself into an arm-chair and began to turn over the leaves.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
15  Its curtains were of damask, with leafy wreaths and garlands, figured upon a gold and silver ground, and fringed along the edges with broideries of pearls, and it stood in a room hung with rows of the queen's devices in cut black velvet upon cloth of silver.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
16  His little dinners, in the settling of which Lord Henry always assisted him, were noted as much for the careful selection and placing of those invited, as for the exquisite taste shown in the decoration of the table, with its subtle symphonic arrangements of exotic flowers, and embroidered cloths, and antique plate of gold and silver.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
17  He would often spend a whole day settling and resettling in their cases the various stones that he had collected, such as the olive-green chrysoberyl that turns red by lamplight, the cymophane with its wirelike line of silver, the pistachio-coloured peridot, rose-pink and wine-yellow topazes, carbuncles of fiery scarlet with tremulous, four-rayed stars, flame-red cinnamon-stones, orange and violet spinels, and amethysts with their alternate layers of ruby and sapphire.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
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