SOUL in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
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 Current Search - Soul in The Count of Monte Cristo
1  Her poetic and excited mind pictured it as the soul of her grandmother.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 73. The Promise.
2  Upon my soul, these women would puzzle the very Devil to read them aright.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 34. The Colosseum.
3  I should have feared to injure both Edmond and yourself, had I divulged my own apprehensions to a soul.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 5. The Marriage-Feast.
4  She had, however, just power to give one parting look to her grandfather, who in losing her seemed to be resigning his very soul.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 94. Maximilian's Avowal.
5  Monte Cristo with a smile on his lips, uttered in the depths of his soul a groan which would have made Villefort fly had he but heard it.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 48. Ideology.
6  I doubt not you will consider these praises the result of blind maternal affection, but there is a soul of iron in that delicate, fragile body.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 47. The Dappled Grays.
7  Haidee, whose soul seemed centred in the business of the stage, like all unsophisticated natures, delighted in whatever addressed itself to the eye or ear.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 53. Robert le Diable.
8  An extreme nervous excitement and a strangely agitated sleep; she fancied this morning in her sleep that her soul was hovering above her body, which she at the same time watched.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 72. Madame de Saint-Meran.
9  Valentine, I have always regarded our love in the light of something sacred; consequently, I have covered it with the veil of respect, and hid it in the innermost recesses of my soul.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 57. In the Lucerne Patch.
10  You have spoken truly, Maximilian; according to the care we bestow upon it, death is either a friend who rocks us gently as a nurse, or an enemy who violently drags the soul from the body.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 117. The Fifth of October.
11  I am something of a physician, and have, like my fellows, sought more than once for the soul in living and in dead matter; yet, like providence, it has remained invisible to my eyes, although present to my heart.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 48. Ideology.
12  All these he bequeathed to me, with a thousand Roman crowns, which he had in ready money, on condition that I would have anniversary masses said for the repose of his soul, and that I would draw up a genealogical tree and history of his house.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 18. The Treasure.
13  Dantes was confused and silent at this explanation of the thoughts which had unconsciously been working in his mind, or rather soul; for there are two distinct sorts of ideas, those that proceed from the head and those that emanate from the heart.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 16. A Learned Italian.
14  Dearest Valentine," said the young man, "the difference between our respective stations makes me fear to offend you by speaking of my love, but yet I cannot find myself in your presence without longing to pour forth my soul, and tell you how fondly I adore you.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 51. Pyramus and Thisbe.
15  At this moment the whole soul of the old man seemed centred in his eyes which became bloodshot; the veins of the throat swelled; his cheeks and temples became purple, as though he was struck with epilepsy; nothing was wanting to complete this but the utterance of a cry.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 103. Maximilian.
16  Franz now listened to it for the third time; yet its notes, so tenderly expressive and fearfully grand as the wretched husband and wife give vent to their different griefs and passions, thrilled through the soul of Franz with an effect equal to his first emotions upon hearing it.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 34. The Colosseum.
17  The more he strove against this unhallowed passion the more his senses yielded to its thrall, and at length, weary of a struggle that taxed his very soul, he gave way and sank back breathless and exhausted beneath the kisses of these marble goddesses, and the enchantment of his marvellous dream.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 31. Italy: Sinbad the Sailor.
18  His forehead was marked with the line that indicates the constant presence of bitter thoughts; he had the fiery eyes that seem to penetrate to the very soul, and the haughty and disdainful upper lip that gives to the words it utters a peculiar character that impresses them on the minds of those to whom they are addressed.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 36. The Carnival at Rome.
19  Like adventurous captains about to embark on some enterprise full of danger, I laid in my provisions, I loaded my weapons, I collected every means of attack and defence; I inured my body to the most violent exercises, my soul to the bitterest trials; I taught my arm to slay, my eyes to behold excruciating sufferings, and my mouth to smile at the most horrid spectacles.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 112. The Departure.
20  There was a moment's silence, during which Sinbad gave himself up to thoughts that seemed to occupy him incessantly, even in the midst of his conversation; and Franz abandoned himself to that mute revery, into which we always sink when smoking excellent tobacco, which seems to remove with its fume all the troubles of the mind, and to give the smoker in exchange all the visions of the soul.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 31. Italy: Sinbad the Sailor.