SPIDER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Spider in Great Expectations
1  A fellow like our friend the Spider," answered Mr. Jaggers, "either beats or cringes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
2  The Spider, as Mr. Jaggers had called him, was used to lying in wait, however, and had the patience of his tribe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
3  So, the Spider, doggedly watching Estella, outwatched many brighter insects, and would often uncoil himself and drop at the right nick of time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
4  Now, I saw the damp lying on the bare hedges and spare grass, like a coarser sort of spiders' webs; hanging itself from twig to twig and blade to blade.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
5  Then, I looked round and saw the disturbed beetles and spiders running away over the floor, and the servants coming in with breathless cries at the door.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
6  In about a month after that, the Spider's time with Mr. Pocket was up for good, and, to the great relief of all the house but Mrs. Pocket, he went home to the family hole.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
7  My thoughts passed into the great room across the landing where the table was spread, and I saw it written, as it were, in the falls of the cobwebs from the centre-piece, in the crawlings of the spiders on the cloth, in the tracks of the mice as they betook their little quickened hearts behind the panels, and in the gropings and pausings of the beetles on the floor.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII