STAIRCASE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Staircase in Hard Times
1  Presently, a light went up-stairs after her, passing first the fanlight of the door, and afterwards the two staircase windows, on its way up.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
2  The same evening, Mrs. Sparsit, in her chamber window, resting from her packing operations, looked towards her great staircase and saw Louisa still descending.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
3  She erected in her mind a mighty Staircase, with a dark pit of shame and ruin at the bottom; and down those stairs, from day to day and hour to hour, she saw Louisa coming.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
4  Thus saying, Mrs. Sparsit, with her Roman features like a medal struck to commemorate her scorn of Mr. Bounderby, surveyed him fixedly from head to foot, swept disdainfully past him, and ascended the staircase.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
5  Next day, Saturday, Mrs. Sparsit sat at her window all day long looking at the customers coming in and out, watching the postmen, keeping an eye on the general traffic of the street, revolving many things in her mind, but, above all, keeping her attention on her staircase.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
6  All the journey, immovable in the air though never left behind; plain to the dark eyes of her mind, as the electric wires which ruled a colossal strip of music-paper out of the evening sky, were plain to the dark eyes of her body; Mrs. Sparsit saw her staircase, with the figure coming down.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
7  Separated from her staircase, all the week, by the length of iron road dividing Coketown from the country house, she yet maintained her cat-like observation of Louisa, through her husband, through her brother, through James Harthouse, through the outsides of letters and packets, through everything animate and inanimate that at any time went near the stairs.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X