SUN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Sun in Great Expectations
1  The sun had been shining brightly all day on the roof of my attic, and the room was warm.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
2  The winking lights upon the bridges were already pale, the coming sun was like a marsh of fire on the horizon.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
3  It was much harder work now, but Herbert and Startop persevered, and rowed and rowed and rowed until the sun went down.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
4  It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
5  And what's the best of all," he said, "you've been more comfortable alonger me, since I was under a dark cloud, than when the sun shone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
6  It had been a fine bright day, but had become foggy as the sun dropped, and I had had to feel my way back among the shipping, pretty carefully.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVII
7  But whether Joe knew how poor I was, and how my great expectations had all dissolved, like our own marsh mists before the sun, I could not understand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
8  The whole scene starts out again in the vivid colors of the moment, down to the drops of April rain on the windows of the court, glittering in the rays of April sun.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
9  There I stood, for minutes, looking at Joe, already at work with a glow of health and strength upon his face that made it show as if the bright sun of the life in store for him were shining on it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
10  As we returned towards the setting sun we had yesterday left behind us, and as the stream of our hopes seemed all running back, I told him how grieved I was to think that he had come home for my sake.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
11  As I looked along the clustered roofs, with church-towers and spires shooting into the unusually clear air, the sun rose up, and a veil seemed to be drawn from the river, and millions of sparkles burst out upon its waters.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
12  I don't know what he had looked like, except a funeral; with the addition of a large Danish sun or star hanging round his neck by a blue ribbon, that had given him the appearance of being insured in some extraordinary Fire Office.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI
13  In a word, I saw in this Miss Havisham as I had her then and there before my eyes, and always had had her before my eyes; and I saw in this, the distinct shadow of the darkened and unhealthy house in which her life was hidden from the sun.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
14  There was the red sun, on the low level of the shore, in a purple haze, fast deepening into black; and there was the solitary flat marsh; and far away there were the rising grounds, between which and us there seemed to be no life, save here and there in the foreground a melancholy gull.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
15  The sun was striking in at the great windows of the court, through the glittering drops of rain upon the glass, and it made a broad shaft of light between the two-and-thirty and the Judge, linking both together, and perhaps reminding some among the audience how both were passing on, with absolute equality, to the greater Judgment that knoweth all things, and cannot err.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI