TASTE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Taste in Sense and Sensibility
1  Their taste was strikingly alike.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
2  And besides all this, I am afraid, Mama, he has no real taste.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
3  Add to which," cried Marianne, "that he has neither genius, taste, nor spirit.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
4  I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  I hope, Marianne," continued Elinor, "you do not consider him as deficient in general taste.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
6  But the correctness of his eye, and the delicacy of his taste, proved to be beyond his politeness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  Every body pretends to feel and tries to describe with the taste and elegance of him who first defined what picturesque beauty was.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
8  Oh, don't be so sly before us," said Mrs. Palmer; "for we know all about it, I assure you; and I admire your taste very much, for I think he is extremely handsome.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
9  He paid her only the compliment of attention; and she felt a respect for him on the occasion, which the others had reasonably forfeited by their shameless want of taste.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
10  My dear," said she, entering, "I have just recollected that I have some of the finest old Constantia wine in the house that ever was tasted, so I have brought a glass of it for your sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
11  I shall not lose you so soon, and Edward will have greater opportunity of improving that natural taste for your favourite pursuit which must be so indispensably necessary to your future felicity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
12  I have not had so many opportunities of estimating the minuter propensities of his mind, his inclinations and tastes, as you have; but I have the highest opinion in the world of his goodness and sense.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
13  Lucy directly drew her work table near her and reseated herself with an alacrity and cheerfulness which seemed to infer that she could taste no greater delight than in making a filigree basket for a spoilt child.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
14  Marianne was afraid of offending, and said no more on the subject; but the kind of approbation which Elinor described as excited in him by the drawings of other people, was very far from that rapturous delight, which, in her opinion, could alone be called taste.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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15  It was necessary to the happiness of both; for however dissimilar in temper and outward behaviour, they strongly resembled each other in that total want of talent and taste which confined their employments, unconnected with such as society produced, within a very narrow compass.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
16  I have seen a great deal of him, have studied his sentiments and heard his opinion on subjects of literature and taste; and, upon the whole, I venture to pronounce that his mind is well-informed, enjoyment of books exceedingly great, his imagination lively, his observation just and correct, and his taste delicate and pure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
17  In showing kindness to his cousins therefore he had the real satisfaction of a good heart; and in settling a family of females only in his cottage, he had all the satisfaction of a sportsman; for a sportsman, though he esteems only those of his sex who are sportsmen likewise, is not often desirous of encouraging their taste by admitting them to a residence within his own manor.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
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