TIME in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - Time in Wuthering Heights
1  Time had little altered his person either.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
2  Time brought resignation, and a melancholy sweeter than common joy.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
3  Time wore on at the Grange in its former pleasant way till Miss Cathy reached sixteen.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
4  I felt stunned by the awful event; and my memory unavoidably recurred to former times with a sort of oppressive sadness.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
5  Well, Mr. Lockwood, I argued and complained, and flatly refused him fifty times; but in the long run he forced me to an agreement.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
6  At other times, she would turn petulantly away, and hide her face in her hands, or even push him off angrily; and then he took care to let her alone, for he was certain of doing no good.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
7  With Hareton the resemblance is carried farther: it is singular at all times, then it was particularly striking; because his senses were alert, and his mental faculties wakened to unwonted activity.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
8  We thought a bolt had fallen in the middle of us; and Joseph swung on to his knees, beseeching the Lord to remember the patriarchs Noah and Lot, and, as in former times, spare the righteous, though he smote the ungodly.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
9  Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I