VILLAGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Village in Great Expectations
1  I mentioned my reason for desiring to avoid observation in the village, and he lauded it to the skies.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
2  Mr. Jaggers had looked on at this, as one who recognized in Joe the village idiot, and in me his keeper.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
3  Of course there was a public-house in the village, and of course Joe liked sometimes to smoke his pipe there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
4  I pointed to where our village lay, on the flat in-shore among the alder-trees and pollards, a mile or more from the church.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
5  I was to leave our village at five in the morning, carrying my little hand-portmanteau, and I had told Joe that I wished to walk away all alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
6  Then I bethought me of a crutch, the shape being much the same, and I borrowed one in the village, and displayed it to my sister with considerable confidence.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
7  It was full of people; the whole village was there, or in the yard; and there was a surgeon, and there was Joe, and there were a group of women, all on the floor in the midst of the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
8  We were joined by no stragglers from the village, for the weather was cold and threatening, the way dreary, the footing bad, darkness coming on, and the people had good fires in-doors and were keeping the day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
9  There was a delicious sense of cleaning-up and making a quiet pause before going on in life afresh, in our village on Saturday nights, which stimulated Joe to dare to stay out half an hour longer on Saturdays than at other times.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
10  I promised myself that I would do something for them one of these days, and formed a plan in outline for bestowing a dinner of roast-beef and plum-pudding, a pint of ale, and a gallon of condescension, upon everybody in the village.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
11  When we had passed the village and the church and the churchyard, and were out on the marshes and began to see the sails of the ships as they sailed on, I began to combine Miss Havisham and Estella with the prospect, in my usual way.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
12  I now fell into a regular routine of apprenticeship life, which was varied beyond the limits of the village and the marshes, by no more remarkable circumstance than the arrival of my birthday and my paying another visit to Miss Havisham.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
13  But the village was very peaceful and quiet, and the light mists were solemnly rising, as if to show me the world, and I had been so innocent and little there, and all beyond was so unknown and great, that in a moment with a strong heave and sob I broke into tears.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
14  The neighborhood, however, highly approved of these arrangements, and we were much admired as we went through the village; the more youthful and vigorous part of the community making dashes now and then to cut us off, and lying in wait to intercept us at points of vantage.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
15  Without having any definite idea of the penalties I had incurred, it was clear to me that village boys could not go stalking about the country, ravaging the houses of gentlefolks and pitching into the studious youth of England, without laying themselves open to severe punishment.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
16  I turned my head aside, for, with a rush and a sweep, like the old marsh winds coming up from the sea, a feeling like that which had subdued me on the morning when I left the forge, when the mists were solemnly rising, and when I laid my hand upon the village finger-post, smote upon my heart again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
17  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
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