WALWORTH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Walworth in Great Expectations
1  Mr. Pip," he replied, with gravity, "Walworth is one place, and this office is another.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVI
2  I invited Wemmick to come up stairs, and refresh himself with a glass of grog before walking to Walworth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
3  From my point of view, he was the wrong twin all the time, and only externally like the Wemmick of Walworth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
4  Deeming Sunday the best day for taking Mr. Wemmick's Walworth sentiments, I devoted the next ensuing Sunday afternoon to a pilgrimage to the Castle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
5  Thinking that he did this to give me an opportunity of taking his Walworth sentiments, I seized the opportunity as soon as we were out of the Castle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
6  If at any odd time when you have nothing better to do, you wouldn't mind coming over to see me at Walworth, I could offer you a bed, and I should consider it an honor.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
7  The flag had been struck, and the gun had been fired, at the right moment of time, and I felt as snugly cut off from the rest of Walworth as if the moat were thirty feet wide by as many deep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
8  So, I went out to Walworth again, and yet again, and yet again, and I saw him by appointment in the City several times, but never held any communication with him on the subject in or near Little Britain.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
9  I had left directions that I was to be called at seven; for it was plain that I must see Wemmick before seeing any one else, and equally plain that this was a case in which his Walworth sentiments only could be taken.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
10  At first with such discourse, and afterwards with conversation of a more general nature, did Mr. Wemmick and I beguile the time and the road, until he gave me to understand that we had arrived in the district of Walworth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
11  My guardian was in his room, washing his hands with his scented soap, when I went into the office from Walworth; and he called me to him, and gave me the invitation for myself and friends which Wemmick had prepared me to receive.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
12  Although I should not have thought of making, in that place, the most distant reference by so much as a look to Wemmick's Walworth sentiments, yet I should have had no objection to catching his eye now and then in a friendly way.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
13  Before a week was out, I received a note from Wemmick, dated Walworth, stating that he hoped he had made some advance in that matter appertaining to our private and personal capacities, and that he would be glad if I could come and see him again upon it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
14  At last, when we got to his place of business and he pulled out his key from his coat-collar, he looked as unconscious of his Walworth property as if the Castle and the drawbridge and the arbor and the lake and the fountain and the Aged, had all been blown into space together by the last discharge of the Stinger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
15  Even when we were groping among Mr. Jaggers's stock of boots for our hats, I felt that the right twin was on his way back; and we had not gone half a dozen yards down Gerrard Street in the Walworth direction, before I found that I was walking arm in arm with the right twin, and that the wrong twin had evaporated into the evening air.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII