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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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1  There's plenty of room for two to kick about in that bed; it's an almighty big bed that.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
2  True, they rather order me about some, and make me jump from spar to spar, like a grasshopper in a May meadow.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
3  I sat down on the side of the bed, and commenced thinking about this head-peddling harpooneer, and his door mat.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
4  But I got a dreaming and sprawling about one night, and somehow, Sam got pitched on the floor, and came near breaking his arm.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
5  It was a negro church; and the preacher's text was about the blackness of darkness, and the weeping and wailing and teeth-gnashing there.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
6  It stood on a sharp bleak corner, where that tempestuous wind Euroclydon kept up a worse howling than ever it did about poor Paul's tossed craft.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
7  But then, what to make of his unearthly complexion, that part of it, I mean, lying round about, and completely independent of the squares of tattooing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
8  Whether that mattress was stuffed with corn-cobs or broken crockery, there is no telling, but I rolled about a good deal, and could not sleep for a long time.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
9  The liquor soon mounted into their heads, as it generally does even with the arrantest topers newly landed from sea, and they began capering about most obstreperously.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
10  But there was no time for shuddering, for now the savage went about something that completely fascinated my attention, and convinced me that he must indeed be a heathen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
11  So gathering up the shavings with another grin, and throwing them into the great stove in the middle of the room, he went about his business, and left me in a brown study.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
12  For my mind was made up to sail in no other than a Nantucket craft, because there was a fine, boisterous something about everything connected with that famous old island, which amazingly pleased me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
13  Yet was there a sort of indefinite, half-attained, unimaginable sublimity about it that fairly froze you to it, till you involuntarily took an oath with yourself to find out what that marvellous painting meant.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
14  Now, when I say that I am in the habit of going to sea whenever I begin to grow hazy about the eyes, and begin to be over conscious of my lungs, I do not mean to have it inferred that I ever go to sea as a passenger.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
15  It was now about nine o'clock, and the room seeming almost supernaturally quiet after these orgies, I began to congratulate myself upon a little plan that had occurred to me just previous to the entrance of the seamen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
16  Ignorance is the parent of fear, and being completely nonplussed and confounded about the stranger, I confess I was now as much afraid of him as if it was the devil himself who had thus broken into my room at the dead of night.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
17  But beginning to feel very cold now, half undressed as I was, and remembering what the landlord said about the harpooneer's not coming home at all that night, it being so very late, I made no more ado, but jumped out of my pantaloons and boots, and then blowing out the light tumbled into bed, and commended myself to the care of heaven.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
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