ADMIRE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - admire in Sense and Sensibility
1  I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
2  And then to turn the discourse, she began admiring the house and the furniture.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
3  And so saying, she took the screens out of her sister-in-law's hands, to admire them herself as they ought to be admired.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
4  And so saying, she took the screens out of her sister-in-law's hands, to admire them herself as they ought to be admired.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
5  "We have heard Sir John admire it excessively," said Lucy, who seemed to think some apology necessary for the freedom of her sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
6  Sir John was loud in his admiration at the end of every song, and as loud in his conversation with the others while every song lasted.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
7  He was not in spirits, however; he praised their house, admired its prospect, was attentive, and kind; but still he was not in spirits.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
8  Music seems scarcely to attract him, and though he admires Elinor's drawings very much, it is not the admiration of a person who can understand their worth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
9  Oh, don't be so sly before us," said Mrs. Palmer; "for we know all about it, I assure you; and I admire your taste very much, for I think he is extremely handsome.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
10  I felt that I admired you, but I told myself it was only friendship; and till I began to make comparisons between yourself and Lucy, I did not know how far I was got.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
11  You know what he thinks of Cowper and Scott; you are certain of his estimating their beauties as he ought, and you have received every assurance of his admiring Pope no more than is proper.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
12  His manly beauty and more than common gracefulness were instantly the theme of general admiration, and the laugh which his gallantry raised against Marianne received particular spirit from his exterior attractions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
13  And with this admirable discretion did she defer the assurance of her finding their mutual relatives more disagreeable than ever, and of her being particularly disgusted with his mother, till they were more in private.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
14  On one side you look across the bowling-green, behind the house, to a beautiful hanging wood, and on the other you have a view of the church and village, and, beyond them, of those fine bold hills that we have so often admired.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
15  The Colonel, though disclaiming all pretensions to connoisseurship, warmly admired the screens, as he would have done any thing painted by Miss Dashwood; and on the curiosity of the others being of course excited, they were handed round for general inspection.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
16  But they would have been improved by some share of his frankness and warmth; and her visit was long enough to detract something from their first admiration, by shewing that, though perfectly well-bred, she was reserved, cold, and had nothing to say for herself beyond the most common-place inquiry or remark.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
17  Elinor and her mother rose up in amazement at their entrance, and while the eyes of both were fixed on him with an evident wonder and a secret admiration which equally sprung from his appearance, he apologized for his intrusion by relating its cause, in a manner so frank and so graceful that his person, which was uncommonly handsome, received additional charms from his voice and expression.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.