AFFECTION in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - affection in Moby Dick
1  It was curious and not unpleasing, how Peleg and Bildad were affected at this juncture, especially Captain Bildad.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. Merry Christmas.
2  Espying the mate drawing near as he was toiling at the pump with the rest, the Lakeman affected not to notice him, but unawed, went on with his gay banterings.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
3  Yet, for all his hardy sobriety and fortitude, there were certain qualities in him which at times affected, and in some cases seemed well nigh to overbalance all the rest.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.
4  By the best authorities, he has always been considered a most trustworthy and unexaggerating historian, except in some one or two particulars, not at all affecting the matter presently to be mentioned.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. The Affidavit.
5  Besides, the English whalers sometimes affect a kind of metropolitan superiority over the American whalers; regarding the long, lean Nantucketer, with his nondescript provincialisms, as a sort of sea-peasant.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 53. The Gam.
6  The truth is, that living or dead, if but decently treated, whales as a species are by no means creatures of ill odor; nor can whalemen be recognised, as the people of the middle ages affected to detect a Jew in the company, by the nose.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 92. Ambergris.
7  To this, in substance, he replied, that though what I hinted was true enough, yet he had a particular affection for his own harpoon, because it was of assured stuff, well tried in many a mortal combat, and deeply intimate with the hearts of whales.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. Wheelbarrow.
8  So powerfully did the whole grim aspect of Ahab affect me, and the livid brand which streaked it, that for the first few moments I hardly noted that not a little of this overbearing grimness was owing to the barbaric white leg upon which he partly stood.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Ahab.
9  But in either case, the needle never again, of itself, recovers the original virtue thus marred or lost; and if the binnacle compasses be affected, the same fate reaches all the others that may be in the ship; even were the lowermost one inserted into the kelson.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 124. The Needle.
10  And since the nose is the central and most conspicuous of the features; and since it perhaps most modifies and finally controls their combined expression; hence it would seem that its entire absence, as an external appendage, must very largely affect the countenance of the whale.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 79. The Prairie.
11  But did you deeply scan him in his more secret confidential hours; when he thought no glance but one was on him; then you would have seen that even as Ahab's eyes so awed the crew's, the inscrutable Parsee's glance awed his; or somehow, at least, in some wild way, at times affected it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 130. The Hat.
12  But this only the more affected some of them, because most mariners cherish a very superstitious feeling about seals, arising not only from their peculiar tones when in distress, but also from the human look of their round heads and semi-intelligent faces, seen peeringly uprising from the water alongside.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 126. The Life-Buoy.
13  To all this I joyously assented; for besides the affection I now felt for Queequeg, he was an experienced harpooneer, and as such, could not fail to be of great usefulness to one, who, like me, was wholly ignorant of the mysteries of whaling, though well acquainted with the sea, as known to merchant seamen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. Biographical.