AFRAID in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - afraid in David Copperfield
1  But I'm not afraid in this way.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
2  'I'm not afraid in this way,' said little Em'ly.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  'I am really afraid he does not,' says my mother.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
4  There I was comfortable, and not afraid of being myself.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
5  My mother was too much afraid of her to refuse compliance with this odd request, if she had any disposition to do so.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
6  He was a sort of town traveller for a number of miscellaneous houses, now; but made little or nothing of it, I am afraid.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
7  I was not angry with them; I was more afraid of them, as if I were cast away among creatures with whom I had no community of nature.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
8  He brought me some chops, and vegetables, and took the covers off in such a bouncing manner that I was afraid I must have given him some offence.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
9  I was almost tempted that evening to tell Steerforth about pretty little Em'ly, but I was too timid of mentioning her name, and too much afraid of his laughing at me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
10  It was my book that he struck his desk with; and as I stood beside him, following his eye as it glanced round the room, I saw the boys all stop, some suddenly surprised, some half afraid, and some sorry perhaps.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
11  I was chiefly edified, I am afraid, by the pictures, which were numerous, and represented all kinds of dismal horrors; but the Martyrs and Peggotty's house have been inseparable in my mind ever since, and are now.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
12  Half the establishment was writhing and crying, before the day's work began; and how much of it had writhed and cried before the day's work was over, I am really afraid to recollect, lest I should seem to exaggerate.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
13  It was such an early day that it came soon, even to me, who was in a fever of expectation, and half afraid that an earthquake or a fiery mountain, or some other great convulsion of nature, might interpose to stop the expedition.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
14  My mother was, no doubt, unusually youthful in appearance even for her years; she hung her head, as if it were her fault, poor thing, and said, sobbing, that indeed she was afraid she was but a childish widow, and would be but a childish mother if she lived.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
15  How from counting months, we came to weeks, and then to days; and how I then began to be afraid that I should not be sent for and when I learnt from Steerforth that I had been sent for, and was certainly to go home, had dim forebodings that I might break my leg first.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
16  This troubled me the more for a long time, because I had soon told Steerforth, from whom I could no more keep such a secret, than I could keep a cake or any other tangible possession, about the two old women Mr. Mell had taken me to see; and I was always afraid that Steerforth would let it out, and twit him with it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
17  I had perception enough to know that my mother was the victim always; that she was afraid to speak to me or to be kind to me, lest she should give them some offence by her manner of doing so, and receive a lecture afterwards; that she was not only ceaselessly afraid of her own offending, but of my offending, and uneasily watched their looks if I only moved.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
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