AGAIN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - again in The Aeneid
1  There the realm of Troy may rise again unforbidden.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
2  Hoar Faith and Vesta, Quirinus and Remus brothers again, shall deliver statutes.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
3  We are lifted skyward on the crescent wave, and again sunk deep into the nether world as the water is sucked away.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
4  Thereat I again gird on my sword, and fitting my left arm into the clasps of the shield, strode forth of the palace.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
5  Nor do Teucrians alone pay forfeit of their blood; once and again valour returns even in conquered hearts, and the victorious Grecians fall.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
6  Yet from another I go on again to tear away a tough shoot, fully to fathom its secret; yet from another black blood follows out of the bark.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
7  Now, as day wanes, she seeks the repeated banquet, and again madly pleads to hear the agonies of Ilium, and again hangs on the teller's lips.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
8  Some scatter to the ships and run for the safety of the shore; some in craven fear again climb the huge horse, and hide in the belly they knew.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
9  Myself I regain the city, girding on my shining armour; fixed to renew every danger, to retrace my way throughout Troy, and fling myself again on its perils.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
10  Again and again his own valiance and his line's renown flood back upon her spirit; look and accent cling fast in her bosom, and the pain allows not rest or calm to her limbs.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
11  We sink low on the ground, and a voice is borne to our ears: "Stubborn race of Dardanus, the same land that bore you by parentage of old shall receive you again on her bountiful breast."
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
12  On the right Scylla keeps guard, on the left unassuaged Charybdis, who thrice swallows the vast flood sheer down her swirling gulf, and ever again hurls it upward, lashing the sky with water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
13  As they again disport with clapping wings, and utter their notes as they circle the sky in company, even so do these ships and crews of thine either lie fast in harbour or glide under full sail into the harbour mouth.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
14  Here the rumour of a story beyond belief comes on our ears; Helenus son of Priam is reigning over Greek towns, master of the bride and sceptre of Pyrrhus the Aeacid; and Andromache hath again fallen to a husband of her people.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
15  My father counsels to remeasure the sea and go again to Phoebus in his Ortygian oracle, to pray for grace and ask what issue he ordains to our exhausted state; whence he bids us search for aid to our woes, whither bend our course.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
16  Again, in a deep recess under a caverned rock, shut in with waving shadows of woodland, we array the board and renew the altar fires; again, from their blind ambush in diverse quarters of the sky, the noisy crowd flutter with clawed feet around their prey, defiling the feast with their lips.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
17  And first he laces to his feet the shoes of gold that bear him high winging over seas or land as fleet as the gale; then takes the rod wherewith he calls wan souls forth of Orcus, or sends them again to the sad depth of hell, gives sleep and takes it away and unseals dead eyes; in whose strength he courses the winds and swims across the tossing clouds.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
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