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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - again in Moby Dick
1  But somehow I grew merry again.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. The Chapel.
2  He answered, to go to sea again, in his old vocation.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. Biographical.
3  Returning from my first morning stroll, I again sallied out upon this special errand.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. The Chapel.
4  A few minutes more, and he rose again, one arm still striking out, and with the other dragging a lifeless form.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. Wheelbarrow.
5  "I'll break it for him," said I, now flying into a passion again at this unaccountable farrago of the landlord's.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
6  The landlord chuckled again with his lean chuckle, and seemed to be mightily tickled at something beyond my comprehension.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
7  In a few moments the savoury steam came forth again, but with a different flavor, and in good time a fine cod-chowder was placed before us.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15. Chowder.
8  It flew from right to left, and back again, almost in one ticking of a watch, and every instant seemed on the point of snapping into splinters.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. Wheelbarrow.
9  Too expensive and jolly, again thought I, pausing one moment to watch the broad glare in the street, and hear the sounds of the tinkling glasses within.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
10  There was a low rumbling of heavy sea-boots among the benches, and a still slighter shuffling of women's shoes, and all was quiet again, and every eye on the preacher.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
11  At first he little noticed these advances; but presently, upon my referring to his last night's hospitalities, he made out to ask me whether we were again to be bedfellows.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
12  At last extinguishing the fire, he took the idol up very unceremoniously, and bagged it again in his grego pocket as carelessly as if he were a sportsman bagging a dead woodcock.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
13  Stammering out something, I knew not what, I rolled away from him against the wall, and then conjured him, whoever or whatever he might be, to keep quiet, and let me get up and light the lamp again.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
14  But, as yet we have not to do with such an one, but with quite another; and still a man, who, if indeed peculiar, it only results again from another phase of the Quaker, modified by individual circumstances.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
15  And ever, as the white moon shows her affrighted face from the steep gullies in the blackness overhead, aghast Jonah sees the rearing bowsprit pointing high upward, but soon beat downward again towards the tormented deep.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
16  Still, looking round me again, and seeing no possible chance of spending a sufferable night unless in some other person's bed, I began to think that after all I might be cherishing unwarrantable prejudices against this unknown harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
17  He would then begin again at the next fifty; seeming to commence at number one each time, as though he could not count more than fifty, and it was only by such a large number of fifties being found together, that his astonishment at the multitude of pages was excited.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
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