ALONE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - alone in Great Expectations
1  But they wouldn't leave me alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
2  Now, I ain't alone, as you may think I am.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
3  Everything was unchanged, and Miss Havisham was alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
4  No; I should not have minded that, if they would only have left me alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
5  Mr. Pumblechook added, after a short interval of reflection, "Look at Pork alone."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
6  The chambers are retired, and we shall be alone together, but we shan't fight, I dare say.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
7  What alone was wanting to the realization of a vast fortune, he considered to be More Capital.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
8  It were but lonesome then," said Joe, "living here alone, and I got acquainted with your sister.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
9  When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
10  I took the opportunity of being alone in the courtyard to look at my coarse hands and my common boots.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  After our early dinner, I strolled out alone, purposing to finish off the marshes at once, and get them done with.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
12  There was no indispensable necessity for my communicating with Joe by letter, inasmuch as he sat beside me and we were alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
13  I was to leave our village at five in the morning, carrying my little hand-portmanteau, and I had told Joe that I wished to walk away all alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
14  My dear friend," said Mr. Pumblechook, taking me by both hands, when he and I and the collation were alone, "I give you joy of your good fortune.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
15  My sister was never left alone now; but Joe more than readily undertook the care of her on that Sunday afternoon, and Biddy and I went out together.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
16  When a man's alone on these flats, with a light head and a light stomach, perishing of cold and want, he hears nothin all night, but guns firing, and voices calling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
17  And when he and I were left alone together, he sat with an air upon him of general lying by in consequence of information he possessed, that really was too much for me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
18  I began to say that I hoped I was not interrupting, when the clerk shoved this gentleman out with as little ceremony as I ever saw used, and tossing his fur cap out after him, left me alone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
19  You know, Pip," said Joe, solemnly, with his last bite in his cheek, and speaking in a confidential voice, as if we two were quite alone, "you and me is always friends, and I'd be the last to tell upon you, any time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
20  It was but natural that I should take to him much more kindly than to Drummle, and that, even in the earliest evenings of our boating, he and I should pull homeward abreast of one another, conversing from boat to boat, while Bentley Drummle came up in our wake alone, under the overhanging banks and among the rushes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV